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The Sacrament of Violence: Myth and War in C.S. Lewis's Ransom Trilogy

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
My primary aim for this study is to illuminate the Ransom trilogy's inherent psychological and spiritual themes, as well as demonstrate how these themes clarify Lewis's philosophical and political goals for the text. Specifically, by investigating Lewis's mythic imagery and suffering motifs in light of psychoanalytic and theological literary criticisms, I elucidate the reasoning behind Lewis's unique(-)and at times, horrific(-)portrayal of fear, violence, and death. I also investigate how Lewis integrates his theology with the horrors of personal and intrapersonal suffering, as well as how he utilizes imagination and myth to explicate the practical (or political) implications of his theodicy. As a whole, I present a systematic study of the relationship between the Great War, myth, and the three Ransom novels, one which reveals how Lewis manipulates his personal traumatic experiences to fashion a romantic Christian understanding of evil and violence in the modern world.
Title: The Sacrament of Violence: Myth and War in C.S. Lewis's Ransom Trilogy.
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Name(s): Engelhardt, Tanya, Author
Campbell, James, Committee Chair
Dandrow, Edward, Committee Member
Jones, Donald, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: My primary aim for this study is to illuminate the Ransom trilogy's inherent psychological and spiritual themes, as well as demonstrate how these themes clarify Lewis's philosophical and political goals for the text. Specifically, by investigating Lewis's mythic imagery and suffering motifs in light of psychoanalytic and theological literary criticisms, I elucidate the reasoning behind Lewis's unique(-)and at times, horrific(-)portrayal of fear, violence, and death. I also investigate how Lewis integrates his theology with the horrors of personal and intrapersonal suffering, as well as how he utilizes imagination and myth to explicate the practical (or political) implications of his theodicy. As a whole, I present a systematic study of the relationship between the Great War, myth, and the three Ransom novels, one which reveals how Lewis manipulates his personal traumatic experiences to fashion a romantic Christian understanding of evil and violence in the modern world.
Identifier: CFE0004279 (IID), ucf:49503 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
M.A.
Graduate Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): C.S. Lewis -- The Ransom Trilogy -- The Space Trilogy -- Out of the Silent Planet -- Perelandra -- That Hideous Strength -- Sacrament -- Violence -- Myth -- War -- Theology -- Psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004279
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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