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Characterization of Dynamic and Static Mechanical Behavior of Polyetherimide

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
Polymers are increasingly being used in engineering designs due to their favorable mechanical properties such as high specific strength, corrosive resistance, manufacturing flexibility. The understanding of the mechanical behavior of these polymers under both static and dynamic loading is critical for their optimal implementation in engineering applications. One such polymer utilized in a wide variety of applications from medical instrumentation to munitions is Polyetherimide, referred to as Ultem. This thesis characterizes both the static and dynamic mechanical behavior of Ultem 1000 through experimental methods and numerical simulations. Standard compression experiments were conducted on and MTS test frame to characterize the elastic-plastic behavior of Ultem 1000 under quasi-static conditions. The dynamic response of the material was investigated at very high strain rates using a custom built miniaturized Kolsky bar apparatus. The smaller Kolsky bar configuration was chosen over the conventional Kolsky device to increase the maximum capable strain rates and to reduce common experimental problems such as wave dispersion, friction, and stress equilibrium. Since a universal test standard for this apparatus is not available, the details of the design, construction, and experimental procedures of this device are provided. The results of the high strain rate testing revealed a bilinear relationship between the material yield stress and strain rate. This relationship was modeled using the Ree-Eyring two stage activation process equation.
Title: Characterization of Dynamic and Static Mechanical Behavior of Polyetherimide.
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Name(s): Mutter, Nathan, Author
Gordon, Ali, Committee Chair
Raghavan, Seetha, Committee Member
Xu, Chengying, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Polymers are increasingly being used in engineering designs due to their favorable mechanical properties such as high specific strength, corrosive resistance, manufacturing flexibility. The understanding of the mechanical behavior of these polymers under both static and dynamic loading is critical for their optimal implementation in engineering applications. One such polymer utilized in a wide variety of applications from medical instrumentation to munitions is Polyetherimide, referred to as Ultem. This thesis characterizes both the static and dynamic mechanical behavior of Ultem 1000 through experimental methods and numerical simulations. Standard compression experiments were conducted on and MTS test frame to characterize the elastic-plastic behavior of Ultem 1000 under quasi-static conditions. The dynamic response of the material was investigated at very high strain rates using a custom built miniaturized Kolsky bar apparatus. The smaller Kolsky bar configuration was chosen over the conventional Kolsky device to increase the maximum capable strain rates and to reduce common experimental problems such as wave dispersion, friction, and stress equilibrium. Since a universal test standard for this apparatus is not available, the details of the design, construction, and experimental procedures of this device are provided. The results of the high strain rate testing revealed a bilinear relationship between the material yield stress and strain rate. This relationship was modeled using the Ree-Eyring two stage activation process equation.
Identifier: CFE0004238 (IID), ucf:49533 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
M.S.M.E.
Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Split-Hopkinson Bar -- Kolsky Bar -- Dynamic Polymer Testing -- Ree-Eyring
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004238
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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