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Stereotypes, Perceptions of Similarity, and Cultural Identity: Factors That May Influence the Academic Achievement of Immigrant Students.

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
For decades, the United States has been known as the nation of immigrants due to the increasing number of immigrant students in the public school system. Although the population of immigrant students steadily increases annually, American society still pressures immigrants into acculturation to fulfill the United States ideals of academic achievement despite the United States claim of multiculturalism (Malcolm (&) Lowery, 2011). This research focuses on 1st- and 2nd generation immigrant students' strife of acceptance in U.S. culture, while sill preserving their own native culture, and the influence it has on academic achievement.The researcher interviewed eight (8) adult participants who are either 1st- or 2nd generation immigrant college students. This qualitative case study research aims to determine if forced acculturation or assimilation using stereotypes and perceptions of similarity effects how immigrant students develop their cultural identity, and the influence it has on academic achievement. Four major themes emerged from the participants' responses: parental approval, peer pressure, environmental influence, and feelings about their ethnic group. Basic findings supported that immigrant students' cultural identity is threatened by stereotypes and perceptions of similarity.
Title: Stereotypes, Perceptions of Similarity, and Cultural Identity: Factors That May Influence the Academic Achievement of Immigrant Students.
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Name(s): Fagan, Tamara, Author
Szente, Judit, Committee Chair
Eriksson, Gillian, Committee Member
Englehart, Deirdre, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: For decades, the United States has been known as the nation of immigrants due to the increasing number of immigrant students in the public school system. Although the population of immigrant students steadily increases annually, American society still pressures immigrants into acculturation to fulfill the United States ideals of academic achievement despite the United States claim of multiculturalism (Malcolm (&) Lowery, 2011). This research focuses on 1st- and 2nd generation immigrant students' strife of acceptance in U.S. culture, while sill preserving their own native culture, and the influence it has on academic achievement.The researcher interviewed eight (8) adult participants who are either 1st- or 2nd generation immigrant college students. This qualitative case study research aims to determine if forced acculturation or assimilation using stereotypes and perceptions of similarity effects how immigrant students develop their cultural identity, and the influence it has on academic achievement. Four major themes emerged from the participants' responses: parental approval, peer pressure, environmental influence, and feelings about their ethnic group. Basic findings supported that immigrant students' cultural identity is threatened by stereotypes and perceptions of similarity.
Identifier: CFE0004996 (IID), ucf:49554 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-12-01
M.S.
Education, Child, Family and Community Sciences
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Immigrant Students -- Stereotypes -- Cultural Identity -- Perceptions of Similarity -- Academic Achievement
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004996
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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