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Novel Nanostructures and Processes for Enhanced Catalysis of Composite Solid Propellants

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this study is to examine the burning behaviour of composite solid propellants (CSP)in the presence of nanoscale, heterogenous catalysts. The study targets the decomposition of am-monium perchlorate (AP) as a key component in the burning profile of these propellants, and seeksto identify parameters of AP decomposition reaction that can be affected by catalytic additives.The decomposition behavior of AP was studied in the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticlesin varying configurations, surface conditions, dopants, morphology, and synthesis parameters withthe AP crystals. The catalytic nanoparticles were found to enhance the decomposition rate of theammonium perchlorate, and promote an accelerated burning rate of CSP propellants containingthe additives. Furthermore, different configurations were shown to have varying degrees of effec-tiveness in promoting the decomposition behaviour.To study the effect of the catalyst's configuration in the bulk propellant, controlled dispersion con-ditions of the nanoparticle catalysts were created and studied using differential scanning calorime-try, as well as model propellant strand burning. The catalysts were shown to promote the greatestenthalpy of reaction, as well as the highest burn rate, when the AP crystals were recrystalizedaround the nanoparticle additives. This is in contrast to the lowest enthalpy condition, which cor-responded to catalysts being dispersed upon the AP crystal surface using bio-molecule templates.Additionally, a method of facile, visible light nanoparticle tracking was developed to study theeffect of mixing and settling parameters on the nano-catalysts. To accomplish this, the titaniananoparticles were doped with fluorescent europium molecules to track the dispersion of the cat-alysts in the propellant binder. This method was shown to succesfully allow for dispersion andagglomeration monitoring without affecting the catalytic effect of the TiO2 nanoparticles.
Title: Novel Nanostructures and Processes for Enhanced Catalysis of Composite Solid Propellants.
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Name(s): Draper, Robert, Author
Seal, Sudipta, Committee Chair
Heinrich, Helge, Committee Member
Zhai, Lei, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this study is to examine the burning behaviour of composite solid propellants (CSP)in the presence of nanoscale, heterogenous catalysts. The study targets the decomposition of am-monium perchlorate (AP) as a key component in the burning profile of these propellants, and seeksto identify parameters of AP decomposition reaction that can be affected by catalytic additives.The decomposition behavior of AP was studied in the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticlesin varying configurations, surface conditions, dopants, morphology, and synthesis parameters withthe AP crystals. The catalytic nanoparticles were found to enhance the decomposition rate of theammonium perchlorate, and promote an accelerated burning rate of CSP propellants containingthe additives. Furthermore, different configurations were shown to have varying degrees of effec-tiveness in promoting the decomposition behaviour.To study the effect of the catalyst's configuration in the bulk propellant, controlled dispersion con-ditions of the nanoparticle catalysts were created and studied using differential scanning calorime-try, as well as model propellant strand burning. The catalysts were shown to promote the greatestenthalpy of reaction, as well as the highest burn rate, when the AP crystals were recrystalizedaround the nanoparticle additives. This is in contrast to the lowest enthalpy condition, which cor-responded to catalysts being dispersed upon the AP crystal surface using bio-molecule templates.Additionally, a method of facile, visible light nanoparticle tracking was developed to study theeffect of mixing and settling parameters on the nano-catalysts. To accomplish this, the titaniananoparticles were doped with fluorescent europium molecules to track the dispersion of the cat-alysts in the propellant binder. This method was shown to succesfully allow for dispersion andagglomeration monitoring without affecting the catalytic effect of the TiO2 nanoparticles.
Identifier: CFE0004991 (IID), ucf:49559 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-12-01
M.S.M.S.E.
Engineering and Computer Science, Materials Science Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Catalyst -- solid propellant -- ammonium perchlorate -- titania -- nanoparticle
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004991
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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