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Deconstructing Differences in Effectiveness of Reading Teachers of Ninth Grade Non-Proficient Readers in One Florida School District

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
ABSTRACT This study was undertaken to identify specific instructional and professional differences between the most effective and least effective teachers of ninth grade students enrolled in intensive reading courses in one Florida school district. Teachers from eleven schools were invited to complete a survey that included categorical, Likert, and open-ended response items. Principals and assistant principals at these schools were also invited to complete a similar survey. Teacher respondents were then divided into three effectiveness groups based on the percentage of their students who met 2011-2012 FCAT performance targets established by Florida's value-added learning growth model. Inferential statistics were used to identify specific attributes that differed among the most and least effective teachers. These attributes included years of classroom teaching experience, status of Florida Reading Endorsement, belief in collaboration with others as a source of effectiveness, valuation of classroom strategies including teaching students to self-monitor their progress and cooperative learning activities, and frequency of use of reading strategies including sustained silent reading and paired/partner student readings. School administrators and the most effective classroom teachers reported similar beliefs about valuation and frequency of use of the four aforementioned classroom strategies. Analysis of responses to open-ended response items resulted in the identification of three instructional themes(-)importance of building positive relationships with students, student practice, and student self-reflection(-)and three resource needs(-)increased access to technology, print resources, and professional learning.
Title: Deconstructing Differences in Effectiveness of Reading Teachers of Ninth Grade Non-Proficient Readers in One Florida School District.
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Name(s): Wysong, Jason, Author
Taylor, Rosemarye, Committee Chair
Murray, Barbara, Committee Member
Baldwin, Gordon, Committee Member
Doherty, Walter, Committee Member
Zugelder, Bryan, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: ABSTRACT This study was undertaken to identify specific instructional and professional differences between the most effective and least effective teachers of ninth grade students enrolled in intensive reading courses in one Florida school district. Teachers from eleven schools were invited to complete a survey that included categorical, Likert, and open-ended response items. Principals and assistant principals at these schools were also invited to complete a similar survey. Teacher respondents were then divided into three effectiveness groups based on the percentage of their students who met 2011-2012 FCAT performance targets established by Florida's value-added learning growth model. Inferential statistics were used to identify specific attributes that differed among the most and least effective teachers. These attributes included years of classroom teaching experience, status of Florida Reading Endorsement, belief in collaboration with others as a source of effectiveness, valuation of classroom strategies including teaching students to self-monitor their progress and cooperative learning activities, and frequency of use of reading strategies including sustained silent reading and paired/partner student readings. School administrators and the most effective classroom teachers reported similar beliefs about valuation and frequency of use of the four aforementioned classroom strategies. Analysis of responses to open-ended response items resulted in the identification of three instructional themes(-)importance of building positive relationships with students, student practice, and student self-reflection(-)and three resource needs(-)increased access to technology, print resources, and professional learning.
Identifier: CFE0004963 (IID), ucf:49571 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-08-01
Ed.D.
Education, Teaching, Learning and Leadership
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Adolescent Literacy -- Intensive Reading -- High School Reading -- Reading Teachers -- Teacher Effectiveness
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004963
Restrictions on Access: campus 2016-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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