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A meta-analytic approach to examining psychosocial correlates of risk in HIV-diagnosed and HIV-nondiagnosed men who have sex with men

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) continues to disproportionately affect men who have sex with men (MSM). Gay, bisexual, and other MSM are estimated to account for two percent of the population, yet they constitute more than half of all individuals living with HIV in the United States (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], 2010). Collectively, both HIV-diagnosed (HIV-D) and HIV-nondiagnosed (HIV-ND) MSM report a variety of reasons for intentional and unintentional nonuse of condoms. Depending on partner status, HIV-D MSM are in the unique position of having the potential both to increase risk of infecting others with HIV and to expose themselves to further complication (e.g., superinfection) when they engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). HIV-ND MSM are at risk of seroconversion each time they engage in UAI with an infected partner or partner of unknown HIV status. Elucidating reasons for continued engagement in UAI specific to both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM likely is an important step in the process of effective prevention. The current study employed meta-analytic methods to evaluate HIV-risk correlates in both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM. In addition to several individual risk correlates, within the context of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model, Behavioral Skills variables were related to condom use in HIV-ND MSM and Motivation variables were related to condom use in both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM. A sufficient number of studies were not available to examine Information-based risk correlates in either subgroup. Results of the present study may guide future best practice in harm reduction for both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM.
Title: A meta-analytic approach to examining psychosocial correlates of risk in HIV-diagnosed and HIV-nondiagnosed men who have sex with men.
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Name(s): Lacefield, Katharine, Author
Negy, Charles, Committee Chair
Beidel, Deborah, Committee Member
Dunn, Stacey, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) continues to disproportionately affect men who have sex with men (MSM). Gay, bisexual, and other MSM are estimated to account for two percent of the population, yet they constitute more than half of all individuals living with HIV in the United States (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], 2010). Collectively, both HIV-diagnosed (HIV-D) and HIV-nondiagnosed (HIV-ND) MSM report a variety of reasons for intentional and unintentional nonuse of condoms. Depending on partner status, HIV-D MSM are in the unique position of having the potential both to increase risk of infecting others with HIV and to expose themselves to further complication (e.g., superinfection) when they engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). HIV-ND MSM are at risk of seroconversion each time they engage in UAI with an infected partner or partner of unknown HIV status. Elucidating reasons for continued engagement in UAI specific to both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM likely is an important step in the process of effective prevention. The current study employed meta-analytic methods to evaluate HIV-risk correlates in both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM. In addition to several individual risk correlates, within the context of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model, Behavioral Skills variables were related to condom use in HIV-ND MSM and Motivation variables were related to condom use in both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM. A sufficient number of studies were not available to examine Information-based risk correlates in either subgroup. Results of the present study may guide future best practice in harm reduction for both HIV-D and HIV-ND MSM.
Identifier: CFE0004874 (IID), ucf:49647 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): MSM -- HIV -- meta-analysis
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004874
Restrictions on Access: campus 2016-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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