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Governmental Responses to Terrorism: Creating Costs and Benefits

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
This thesis assesses four governmental responses to terrorism: conciliation, denial, legal restriction, and violence, each of which may be focused on an organization or its leaders. The theory makes predictions on the resulting frequency and severity of terrorism. Unlessresponses reduce an organization's capacity or desire to attack, the frequency of attacks may be reduced, while the severity continues to increase. The theory is tested using a time series regression analysis of the effects of government action on terrorism in Algeria and thePhilippines. In general, the results show that conciliation may led to increases in terrorism in the short term while suggesting potential reductions in the long term. Denial and legal restriction often led to increases in terrorism, while the effects of violence often depended upon whether the response was applied to organizations or their leaders.
Title: Governmental Responses to Terrorism: Creating Costs and Benefits.
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Name(s): Klose, Kenneth, Author
Dolan, Thomas, Committee Chair
Schafer, Mark, Committee Member
Mirilovic, Nikola, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis assesses four governmental responses to terrorism: conciliation, denial, legal restriction, and violence, each of which may be focused on an organization or its leaders. The theory makes predictions on the resulting frequency and severity of terrorism. Unlessresponses reduce an organization's capacity or desire to attack, the frequency of attacks may be reduced, while the severity continues to increase. The theory is tested using a time series regression analysis of the effects of government action on terrorism in Algeria and thePhilippines. In general, the results show that conciliation may led to increases in terrorism in the short term while suggesting potential reductions in the long term. Denial and legal restriction often led to increases in terrorism, while the effects of violence often depended upon whether the response was applied to organizations or their leaders.
Identifier: CFE0004872 (IID), ucf:49670 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): government -- responses -- terrorism
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004872
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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