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Examining the Effect of the Universal Design for Learning Expression Principle on Students with learning Disabilities in Science

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
ABSTRACT The significance of students being able to express and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding in all content areas has always been important especially in the sciences. Students under the Next Generation Science Standards will be required to participate in science discourse through a variety of approaches. This study examined student engagement and student demonstration of content knowledge in inclusive science classrooms through a quasi-experimental research design which included four case study participants with a learning disability. The researcher also evaluated student content knowledge through the implementation of Universal Design for Learning-Expression (UDL-E) through a non-replicated control group design. Data were collected through a variety of sources including: researcher observations, review of student academic records, interviews, surveys, UDL-E products, and pre-test and posttest scores. Researcher observations spanned over a 10 week period and were coded and analyzed quantitatively. Findings from a Repeated ANOVA demonstrated no statistical significance, however based on interviews with students; findings show that the students did enjoy exploring the opportunity to express their knowledge using the Expression principle of Universal Design for Learning. Student time-on-task did remain equally as high during UDL-E and students' inattentive behaviors decreased.
Title: Examining the Effect of the Universal Design for Learning Expression Principle on Students with learning Disabilities in Science.
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Name(s): Finnegan, Lisa, Author
Dieker, Lisa, Committee Chair
Wienke, Wilfred, Committee Member
Hines, Rebecca, Committee Member
Everett, Robert, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: ABSTRACT The significance of students being able to express and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding in all content areas has always been important especially in the sciences. Students under the Next Generation Science Standards will be required to participate in science discourse through a variety of approaches. This study examined student engagement and student demonstration of content knowledge in inclusive science classrooms through a quasi-experimental research design which included four case study participants with a learning disability. The researcher also evaluated student content knowledge through the implementation of Universal Design for Learning-Expression (UDL-E) through a non-replicated control group design. Data were collected through a variety of sources including: researcher observations, review of student academic records, interviews, surveys, UDL-E products, and pre-test and posttest scores. Researcher observations spanned over a 10 week period and were coded and analyzed quantitatively. Findings from a Repeated ANOVA demonstrated no statistical significance, however based on interviews with students; findings show that the students did enjoy exploring the opportunity to express their knowledge using the Expression principle of Universal Design for Learning. Student time-on-task did remain equally as high during UDL-E and students' inattentive behaviors decreased.
Identifier: CFE0004840 (IID), ucf:49709 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-08-01
Ph.D.
Education, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Middle School science -- Universal Design for Learning -Expression -- technology tools -- Students with Learning Disabilities
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004840
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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