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Evaluation of a digitally enhanced Expectancy Challenge Alcohol Literacy Curriculum (ECALC) for use with mandated college students

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
Alcohol use has been a longstanding problem on college campuses. Despite the efforts National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the commissioned Task Force on College Drinking (2002), there has been a recent rise in the number of alcohol related arrests and violations on college campuses. Within the high-risk mandated student population, the most successful programs utilize motivational enhancement strategies, such as the Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS). Likely due to financial constraints, an important issue that has been raised is the limited availability of validated methods for alcohol prevention and intervention on college campuses. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the digitally assisted Expectancy Challenge Alcohol Literacy Curriculum (ECALC) by direct comparison of the ECALC to an already well-established treatment (i.e., BASICS) in an effort to reduce problematic alcohol use and related negative consequences among mandated college students. The role of the digital enhancements is to decrease time and resources necessary for training facilitators and aid in widespread implementation. Analyses revealed significant reductions on all four positive alcohol expectancies subscales for those in the ECALC condition and a significant intervening effect for the expectancies of Sociability and Liquid Courage. Results also revealed that for both males and females, those in the ECALC condition demonstrated significantly greater reductions in frequency of alcohol use (i.e., number of drinking days per month) and comparable reductions in typical (i.e., mean BAC, average drinks per sitting, average drinks per week) and heavy alcohol use (i.e., peak BAC, peak drinks per sitting, number of binge episodes) at follow-up when compared to those in the BASICS condition.
Title: Evaluation of a digitally enhanced Expectancy Challenge Alcohol Literacy Curriculum (ECALC) for use with mandated college students.
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Name(s): Fried, Abigail, Author
Dunn, Michael, Committee Chair
Cassisi, Jeffrey, Committee Member
Bowers, Clint, Committee Member
Orr, Deborah, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Alcohol use has been a longstanding problem on college campuses. Despite the efforts National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the commissioned Task Force on College Drinking (2002), there has been a recent rise in the number of alcohol related arrests and violations on college campuses. Within the high-risk mandated student population, the most successful programs utilize motivational enhancement strategies, such as the Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS). Likely due to financial constraints, an important issue that has been raised is the limited availability of validated methods for alcohol prevention and intervention on college campuses. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the digitally assisted Expectancy Challenge Alcohol Literacy Curriculum (ECALC) by direct comparison of the ECALC to an already well-established treatment (i.e., BASICS) in an effort to reduce problematic alcohol use and related negative consequences among mandated college students. The role of the digital enhancements is to decrease time and resources necessary for training facilitators and aid in widespread implementation. Analyses revealed significant reductions on all four positive alcohol expectancies subscales for those in the ECALC condition and a significant intervening effect for the expectancies of Sociability and Liquid Courage. Results also revealed that for both males and females, those in the ECALC condition demonstrated significantly greater reductions in frequency of alcohol use (i.e., number of drinking days per month) and comparable reductions in typical (i.e., mean BAC, average drinks per sitting, average drinks per week) and heavy alcohol use (i.e., peak BAC, peak drinks per sitting, number of binge episodes) at follow-up when compared to those in the BASICS condition.
Identifier: CFE0004843 (IID), ucf:49712 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): alcohol expectancies -- alcohol -- college students -- intervention
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004843
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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