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Random Transformations of Optical Fields and Applications

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
The interaction of optical waves with material systems often results in complex, seemingly random fields. In many cases, the interaction, while complicated, is both linear and deterministic.This dissertation focuses on the possible inverse problems associated with the determination of either the excitation field or the scattering system. The scattered field can be thought of as a massive sampling and mixing of the excitation field. This dissertation will show how such complicated sampling functions can be characterized and how the corresponding scattering medium can then be used as an optical device such as a lens, polarimeter, or spectrometer.Another class of inverse problems deals with extracting information about the material system from changes in the scattered field. This dissertation includes a novel technique, based on dynamic light scattering, that allows for a full polarimetric measurement of the scattered light using a reference field with controllable polarization. Another technique relates to imaging the reflectivity of a target that is being randomly illuminated. We demonstrate that a method based on the correlation between the integrated scattered intensity and the corresponding illumination intensity distribution can prove superior to standard imaging microscopy at low-light levels.
Title: Random Transformations of Optical Fields and Applications.
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Name(s): Kohlgraf-Owens, Thomas, Author
Dogariu, Aristide, Committee Chair
Saleh, Bahaa, Committee Member
Schulzgen, Axel, Committee Member
Tamasan, Alexandru, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The interaction of optical waves with material systems often results in complex, seemingly random fields. In many cases, the interaction, while complicated, is both linear and deterministic.This dissertation focuses on the possible inverse problems associated with the determination of either the excitation field or the scattering system. The scattered field can be thought of as a massive sampling and mixing of the excitation field. This dissertation will show how such complicated sampling functions can be characterized and how the corresponding scattering medium can then be used as an optical device such as a lens, polarimeter, or spectrometer.Another class of inverse problems deals with extracting information about the material system from changes in the scattered field. This dissertation includes a novel technique, based on dynamic light scattering, that allows for a full polarimetric measurement of the scattered light using a reference field with controllable polarization. Another technique relates to imaging the reflectivity of a target that is being randomly illuminated. We demonstrate that a method based on the correlation between the integrated scattered intensity and the corresponding illumination intensity distribution can prove superior to standard imaging microscopy at low-light levels.
Identifier: CFE0004786 (IID), ucf:49746 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-12-01
Ph.D.
Optics and Photonics, Optics and Photonics
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Scattering -- Speckle -- Polarimetry -- Spectroscopy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004786
Restrictions on Access: campus 2016-06-15
Host Institution: UCF

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