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A Randomized Trial of Attention Training for Generalized Social Phobia: Does Attention Training Change Social Behavior?

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
The use of attention training protocols for the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder (SAD) is undergoing increased examination. Initial investigations were positive but more recent investigations have been less supportive of the treatment paradigm. One significant limitation of current investigations may be over-reliance on self-report. In this investigation, we expanded on initial investigations by using a multimodal assessment of patient functioning (i.e., including behavioral assessment). Patients with a primary diagnosis of SAD (n = 31) were randomly assigned to eight sessions of attention training (n = 15) or placebo/control (n = 16). Participants were assessed at pre- and post-treatment via self- and clinician-report of social anxiety as well as anxious and behavioral response to two in vivo social interactions. Results revealed no differences between groups at post-treatment for all study outcome variables, suggesting a lack of effect for the attention training condition. The results are concordant with recent investigations finding a lack of support for the use of attention training as an efficacious treatment for patients with SAD.
Title: A Randomized Trial of Attention Training for Generalized Social Phobia: Does Attention Training Change Social Behavior?.
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Name(s): Bunnell, Brian, Author
Beidel, Deborah, Committee Chair
Cassisi, Jeffrey, Committee Member
Rapport, Mark, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The use of attention training protocols for the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder (SAD) is undergoing increased examination. Initial investigations were positive but more recent investigations have been less supportive of the treatment paradigm. One significant limitation of current investigations may be over-reliance on self-report. In this investigation, we expanded on initial investigations by using a multimodal assessment of patient functioning (i.e., including behavioral assessment). Patients with a primary diagnosis of SAD (n = 31) were randomly assigned to eight sessions of attention training (n = 15) or placebo/control (n = 16). Participants were assessed at pre- and post-treatment via self- and clinician-report of social anxiety as well as anxious and behavioral response to two in vivo social interactions. Results revealed no differences between groups at post-treatment for all study outcome variables, suggesting a lack of effect for the attention training condition. The results are concordant with recent investigations finding a lack of support for the use of attention training as an efficacious treatment for patients with SAD.
Identifier: CFE0004658 (IID), ucf:49879 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
M.S.
Sciences, Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): social phobia -- attention training -- treatment
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004658
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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