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Success in Technology Organizations

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
In today's economic environment, it is advantageous for technology organizations to be cognizant of prevalent influences on success and failure and to incorporate this knowledge into their business and innovation strategies. Technology organizations were defined within this research as those in the business of created competence which is expressed in terms of entities consisting of devices, procedures, and acquired human skills (Clarke, 2005). Although, no organization contains the ideal mix of culture and ideological emphases, some have amassed impressive track records of great success. A literature review was used to identify factors relevant within similar contexts such as influences on creativity, innovation, Research and Development (R(&)D), etcetera. The salient factors identified within the literature review were hypothesized as being very important to great success within technology organizations. A conceptual model was created that visually illustrated the interactions of those factors and their influence on technology organization success which was defined as average annual revenue growth and direct new job creation. An internet questionnaire was utilized to test the hypotheses among 15 very successful technology organizations according to their respective Chief Technology Officers (CTOs) or equivalents. These companies were randomly chosen from a population of the technology organizations included in Inc. Magazine's Inc. 5000, a list of the 5000 fastest growing companies in America. The questionnaire primarily consisted of Likert questions designed to test the hypotheses. The dependent variable in the statistical analyses, technology organization success, was ranked according to average annual revenue growth and direct new job creation relative to the other organizations within the sample set. The top category in typical questionnaire Likert questions included the adjective (")very(") that was interpreted to imply that the particular factor was exactly or precisely essential to affect that level of success, this in the collective opinion of the CTOs. Not meeting the threshold of exactly or precisely was interpreted that the factor may not be essential to that level of success. Rejection of the respective null hypotheses and subsequent acceptance of the alternative hypotheses were interpreted as evidence that particular factors were essential to great levels of technology organization success. And, the conceptual model was updated accordingly. Acceptance of null hypotheses demonstrated that the factors may not be essential; therefore, they were excluded from further discussion and the model. Seventeen key factors and/or categories were identified according to the Chief Technology Officers within the population of very successful technology organizations as having substantial influence on the success of those organizations. Recommendations were made to technology organizations aspiring towards prolific levels of success.As a check, three open-ended questions were included and used to verify that no consensus crucial elements were omitted within the Likert question section of the questionnaire. There were no consensus factors identified within those open-ended questions.
Title: Success in Technology Organizations.
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Name(s): Bass, Joseph, Author
Elshennawy, Ahmad, Committee Chair
Rabelo, Luis, Committee Member
O'Neal, Thomas, Committee Member
Sivo, Stephen, Committee Member
Hosni, Yasser, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: In today's economic environment, it is advantageous for technology organizations to be cognizant of prevalent influences on success and failure and to incorporate this knowledge into their business and innovation strategies. Technology organizations were defined within this research as those in the business of created competence which is expressed in terms of entities consisting of devices, procedures, and acquired human skills (Clarke, 2005). Although, no organization contains the ideal mix of culture and ideological emphases, some have amassed impressive track records of great success. A literature review was used to identify factors relevant within similar contexts such as influences on creativity, innovation, Research and Development (R(&)D), etcetera. The salient factors identified within the literature review were hypothesized as being very important to great success within technology organizations. A conceptual model was created that visually illustrated the interactions of those factors and their influence on technology organization success which was defined as average annual revenue growth and direct new job creation. An internet questionnaire was utilized to test the hypotheses among 15 very successful technology organizations according to their respective Chief Technology Officers (CTOs) or equivalents. These companies were randomly chosen from a population of the technology organizations included in Inc. Magazine's Inc. 5000, a list of the 5000 fastest growing companies in America. The questionnaire primarily consisted of Likert questions designed to test the hypotheses. The dependent variable in the statistical analyses, technology organization success, was ranked according to average annual revenue growth and direct new job creation relative to the other organizations within the sample set. The top category in typical questionnaire Likert questions included the adjective (")very(") that was interpreted to imply that the particular factor was exactly or precisely essential to affect that level of success, this in the collective opinion of the CTOs. Not meeting the threshold of exactly or precisely was interpreted that the factor may not be essential to that level of success. Rejection of the respective null hypotheses and subsequent acceptance of the alternative hypotheses were interpreted as evidence that particular factors were essential to great levels of technology organization success. And, the conceptual model was updated accordingly. Acceptance of null hypotheses demonstrated that the factors may not be essential; therefore, they were excluded from further discussion and the model. Seventeen key factors and/or categories were identified according to the Chief Technology Officers within the population of very successful technology organizations as having substantial influence on the success of those organizations. Recommendations were made to technology organizations aspiring towards prolific levels of success.As a check, three open-ended questions were included and used to verify that no consensus crucial elements were omitted within the Likert question section of the questionnaire. There were no consensus factors identified within those open-ended questions.
Identifier: CFE0004652 (IID), ucf:49903 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Industrial Engineering and Management Systems
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Technology Organization Success -- Success -- Growth -- Organization
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004652
Restrictions on Access: campus 2018-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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