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Through the Eyes of First-Year College Students: The Importance of Trust in the Development of Effective Advising Relationships

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
This research was conducted to better understand how first-year college students make sense of the role of trust in the development of the relationship with their academic advisors and how they characterize the conditions that enhance or hinder trust in this relationship. An extensive literature review was conducted, identifying relevant scholarship concerning trust and academic advising--the history, philosophy, and professionalization of the field. Also, a brief section on distrust was presented to offer balance in the trust literature and to support the Lewicki, McAllister, (&) Bies' (1998) theoretical framework that guided this research endeavor. Moreover, a profile of the traditional, first-year college student was introduced, as this distinct population was asked to participate in this study and to share their unique lived experiences, detailing the relationships they have developed with their academic advisors. A phenomenological research design was employed, collecting participant data via in-depth interviews, an advisor/trust orientation exercise, and member checking. After these data were collected, the Moustakas (1994) four-step approach to data analysis was utilized as a means of data reduction. Eight traditional, first-year college students participated in this research endeavor, and all indicated that the role of trust was important in the development of the relationship with their academic advisors. Also, they isolated four trust characteristics that may enhance trust in their advising relationships: initiative, knowledge/expertise, kindness, and reliability. Likewise, the inverse of these named trust facets may hinder trust in their advising relationships. These new discoveries offer powerful insights for advancing the field of collegiate level academic advising.
Title: Through the Eyes of First-Year College Students: The Importance of Trust in the Development of Effective Advising Relationships.
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Name(s): Lemon, Mark, Author
Cintron Delgado, Rosa, Committee Chair
Boyd, Tammy, Committee Member
Owens, James, Committee Member
Beverly, Monifa, Committee Member
Laureano Fuentes, Gloria, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This research was conducted to better understand how first-year college students make sense of the role of trust in the development of the relationship with their academic advisors and how they characterize the conditions that enhance or hinder trust in this relationship. An extensive literature review was conducted, identifying relevant scholarship concerning trust and academic advising--the history, philosophy, and professionalization of the field. Also, a brief section on distrust was presented to offer balance in the trust literature and to support the Lewicki, McAllister, (&) Bies' (1998) theoretical framework that guided this research endeavor. Moreover, a profile of the traditional, first-year college student was introduced, as this distinct population was asked to participate in this study and to share their unique lived experiences, detailing the relationships they have developed with their academic advisors. A phenomenological research design was employed, collecting participant data via in-depth interviews, an advisor/trust orientation exercise, and member checking. After these data were collected, the Moustakas (1994) four-step approach to data analysis was utilized as a means of data reduction. Eight traditional, first-year college students participated in this research endeavor, and all indicated that the role of trust was important in the development of the relationship with their academic advisors. Also, they isolated four trust characteristics that may enhance trust in their advising relationships: initiative, knowledge/expertise, kindness, and reliability. Likewise, the inverse of these named trust facets may hinder trust in their advising relationships. These new discoveries offer powerful insights for advancing the field of collegiate level academic advising.
Identifier: CFE0005022 (IID), ucf:49984 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-12-01
Ph.D.
Education, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): academic advising -- academic advisor(s) -- advising relationships -- first-year college student(s) -- freshman -- relationships -- trust
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005022
Restrictions on Access: campus 2016-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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