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Five School District Mentor Models for Secondary Mathematics and Science Teachers in a Job Embedded University Teacher Preparation Program

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Mentoring was a component of the Resident Teacher Professional Preparation Program (RTP3), a Race to the Top (RTTT) program funded project. RTTT funded efforts reward states that have demonstrated success in raising student achievement and have the best plans to accelerate learning in the future (U.S. Department of Education, 2014). Five Florida school districts implemented different variations of the RTP3 mentor model and due to the unique needs of each school district, context differences in effectiveness may have emerged. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences among the five mentor models, the extent to which these differences may relate to variances in mentoring effectiveness, and the impact on persistence of the resident teachers in teaching. School district designee interviews were conducted and mentor and resident teacher surveys were administered. Interview and survey data were analyzed using the grounded theory approach (Glaser (&) Strauss, 1967) and open coding (Strauss (&) Corbin, 1990) to determine mentor and resident teacher perceptions of the effectiveness of the RTP3 mentoring support.The findings of the research suggest that the decisions of the five partner school districts to add additional targeted supports to their mentor models had an impact on increased persistence rates and decreased rates of resident teachers leaving the field of teaching. The majority of mentors perceived that common professional learning increased their capacity as a mentor to a moderate or large degree. The findings suggest that resident teachers who had school-based mentors perceived that their mentors were somewhat to very influential in assisting them in being more effective teachers. There were limitations to this study. Five school districts in the state of Florida were used in the study, and the sample of survey and interview participants were limited. Therefore results may not be able to be generalized to other school districts in Florida or other states. Additionally, the objectivity of survey and interview participants may be questioned because the participants were employees of the school district. However, it was assumed that participant's responses to the survey and interview questions were candid.Further research is recommended that would examine variations in school district mentor preparation and selection processes. Further recommendations would include evaluating different mentor models within the same context to better examine the impact of specific components of mentoring programs and considering the effectiveness of the mentee based on not only mentee perception of increased effectiveness, but effectiveness as determined by the school district-adopted evaluation system. Another avenue for future research to broaden and support the findings in this study would be to access whether effective mentoring models differ depending on the context and based on the needs and experiences of the beginning teachers.?
Title: Five School District Mentor Models for Secondary Mathematics and Science Teachers in a Job Embedded University Teacher Preparation Program.
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Name(s): Karcinski, Lisa, Author
Taylor, Rosemarye, Committee Chair
Swan, Bonnie, Committee Member
Doherty, Walter, Committee Member
Baldwin, Lee, Committee Member
Wilson, Corbet, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Mentoring was a component of the Resident Teacher Professional Preparation Program (RTP3), a Race to the Top (RTTT) program funded project. RTTT funded efforts reward states that have demonstrated success in raising student achievement and have the best plans to accelerate learning in the future (U.S. Department of Education, 2014). Five Florida school districts implemented different variations of the RTP3 mentor model and due to the unique needs of each school district, context differences in effectiveness may have emerged. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences among the five mentor models, the extent to which these differences may relate to variances in mentoring effectiveness, and the impact on persistence of the resident teachers in teaching. School district designee interviews were conducted and mentor and resident teacher surveys were administered. Interview and survey data were analyzed using the grounded theory approach (Glaser (&) Strauss, 1967) and open coding (Strauss (&) Corbin, 1990) to determine mentor and resident teacher perceptions of the effectiveness of the RTP3 mentoring support.The findings of the research suggest that the decisions of the five partner school districts to add additional targeted supports to their mentor models had an impact on increased persistence rates and decreased rates of resident teachers leaving the field of teaching. The majority of mentors perceived that common professional learning increased their capacity as a mentor to a moderate or large degree. The findings suggest that resident teachers who had school-based mentors perceived that their mentors were somewhat to very influential in assisting them in being more effective teachers. There were limitations to this study. Five school districts in the state of Florida were used in the study, and the sample of survey and interview participants were limited. Therefore results may not be able to be generalized to other school districts in Florida or other states. Additionally, the objectivity of survey and interview participants may be questioned because the participants were employees of the school district. However, it was assumed that participant's responses to the survey and interview questions were candid.Further research is recommended that would examine variations in school district mentor preparation and selection processes. Further recommendations would include evaluating different mentor models within the same context to better examine the impact of specific components of mentoring programs and considering the effectiveness of the mentee based on not only mentee perception of increased effectiveness, but effectiveness as determined by the school district-adopted evaluation system. Another avenue for future research to broaden and support the findings in this study would be to access whether effective mentoring models differ depending on the context and based on the needs and experiences of the beginning teachers.?
Identifier: CFE0005639 (IID), ucf:50231 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Teaching, Learning and Leadership
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Mentoring -- Resident Teacher -- Teacher Preparation -- Induction -- Professional Development -- Mathematics and Science -- Beginning Teacher
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005639
Restrictions on Access: campus 2018-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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