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Hmong Americans in Higher Education: Exploring their Sense of Belongingness and the Concept of the American Dream.

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
I conducted this study to examine Hmong American college students' perspectives on sense of belongingness and their idea on the American Dream. The college experience can serve as a precursor to improving the social and economic situation of the Hmong students when aligned with the personal desire to gain upward mobility and motivation to circumvent social and academic inconsistencies.The methodology of the study was designed for one-on-one phenomenological informal interviews with Hmong American college upper-classmen using a two-part interview protocol to elicit demographic and experiential information. Moustakas' approach to the analysis of data provided guidelines to review individual transcripts and to group, remove, cluster, and thematize lived experiences.The findings of this study indicated that Hmong college students: (a) enrolled out of obedience to the parents, especially their fathers, regardless of the educational level of the parents and (b) thrived when authority figures on campus reached out to help their humble situation. . . it not only made them belong to the campus family but it strengthened their self-esteem.
Title: Hmong Americans in Higher Education: Exploring their Sense of Belongingness and the Concept of the American Dream.
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Name(s): Daugherty, Janet, Author
Cintron Delgado, Rosa, Committee Chair
Owens, J. Thomas, Committee Member
Cox, Thomas, Committee Member
Molina, Olga, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: I conducted this study to examine Hmong American college students' perspectives on sense of belongingness and their idea on the American Dream. The college experience can serve as a precursor to improving the social and economic situation of the Hmong students when aligned with the personal desire to gain upward mobility and motivation to circumvent social and academic inconsistencies.The methodology of the study was designed for one-on-one phenomenological informal interviews with Hmong American college upper-classmen using a two-part interview protocol to elicit demographic and experiential information. Moustakas' approach to the analysis of data provided guidelines to review individual transcripts and to group, remove, cluster, and thematize lived experiences.The findings of this study indicated that Hmong college students: (a) enrolled out of obedience to the parents, especially their fathers, regardless of the educational level of the parents and (b) thrived when authority figures on campus reached out to help their humble situation. . . it not only made them belong to the campus family but it strengthened their self-esteem.
Identifier: CFE0005596 (IID), ucf:50250 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
Ph.D.
Education and Human Performance, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Hmong College Student -- US-born Hmong -- American Dream -- Sense of Belongingness -- Faculty Warnth -- Pedagogical Caring -- Higher Education -- Denominational College -- Diversity -- Cross-Cultural -- Culture -- Model Minority Myth -- Phenomenology -- Interview -- Qualitative Research -- Content Matrix Analysis
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005596
Restrictions on Access: campus 2016-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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