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A Case Study of the Self-efficacy of High School Aged Underrepresented Minority Women Entering the Medical Pipeline

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
This study focused on the self-efficacy and experiences described by a purposively sampled case (n = 8) of high school-aged underrepresented minority women (URMW) as they entered the medical career pipeline through their participation in a formal medical pipeline program. The study was framed by three theories: intersectionality, positionality, and self-efficacy. Research questions were analyzed qualitatively, using case study methods, and quantitatively, using a paired sample t-test. Study data revealed that participants came into the program with high levels of self-efficacy in several self-efficacy factors. Yet, participants in the pipeline program made significant improvements in their self-assertive efficacy.Analysis of other data revealed that students remained motivated and persisted in the pursuit of their aspirations in spite of challenges they encountered because of their ethnicities and gender. Also, students described a lack of engagement with science courses, indicated poor relationships with science instructors, and revealed inadequate understanding of important high science content that, along with ethnic and gendered factors, caused them to negatively position themselves in science. This study provides valuable information to K-12 science educators, medical education institutions, and policy makers concerned with extending science education and healthcare-related career opportunities to minority women.
Title: A Case Study of the Self-efficacy of High School Aged Underrepresented Minority Women Entering the Medical Pipeline.
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Name(s): Dames, Jennifer, Author
Jeanpierre, Bobby, Committee Chair
Butler, Malcolm, Committee Member
Hopp, Carolyn, Committee Member
Beverly, Monifa, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study focused on the self-efficacy and experiences described by a purposively sampled case (n = 8) of high school-aged underrepresented minority women (URMW) as they entered the medical career pipeline through their participation in a formal medical pipeline program. The study was framed by three theories: intersectionality, positionality, and self-efficacy. Research questions were analyzed qualitatively, using case study methods, and quantitatively, using a paired sample t-test. Study data revealed that participants came into the program with high levels of self-efficacy in several self-efficacy factors. Yet, participants in the pipeline program made significant improvements in their self-assertive efficacy.Analysis of other data revealed that students remained motivated and persisted in the pursuit of their aspirations in spite of challenges they encountered because of their ethnicities and gender. Also, students described a lack of engagement with science courses, indicated poor relationships with science instructors, and revealed inadequate understanding of important high science content that, along with ethnic and gendered factors, caused them to negatively position themselves in science. This study provides valuable information to K-12 science educators, medical education institutions, and policy makers concerned with extending science education and healthcare-related career opportunities to minority women.
Identifier: CFE0005321 (IID), ucf:50522 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-08-01
Ph.D.
Education and Human Performance, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): medical pipeline -- intersectionality -- underrepresented minority women -- science positionality -- self-efficacy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005321
Restrictions on Access: public 2014-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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