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Development of Novel Redox Sensors and Processes Towards Biological Applications

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
Research on the cure and early detection of diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's is becoming of great interest due to the increasing number of people affected by them every year. An accurate and quick detection of various damaging species is highly critical in treatments of such diseases not only for exploring possible cures but also for early detection. If these diseases are detected during the initial stages than the possibility of curing them is much higher. Motivated by this, many researchers today have developed numerous types of sensing devices that can detect various physiological and biological compounds. However, most of these sensors are enzyme based. They have several setbacks such as the lack of sensitivity, restricted selectivity, short shelf life, and biological fouling. To overcome these obstacles, we examine the use of nanoceria modified Pt and Au electrodes for the detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. Amperometric detection of glucose and hydrogen peroxide is critical for biological applications for diabetes and possible Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. This dissertation focuses on the exploration of non-enzymatic detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species which has the prospective to be used for biological applications, in addition to an investigation of an odor control technology that uses these reactive oxygen species for the treatment of wastewater plants. The combination of bi-metallic composites with nanoceria showed increased oxidation ability towards glucose and hydrogen peroxide. The following dissertation expands on the relationship between bi-metallic nanoceria composite materials and its electro-oxidation of glucose and hydrogen peroxide towards biological sensing along with an investigation of an odor control technology that utilizes generates hydroxyl radical fine particle mist for the degradation of hydrogen sulfide odor in wastewater treatment plants.
Title: Development of Novel Redox Sensors and Processes Towards Biological Applications.
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Name(s): Patel, Jigna, Author
Yestrebsky, Cherie, Committee Chair
Clausen, Christian, Committee Member
Hampton, Michael, Committee Member
Harper, James, Committee Member
Diaz, Diego, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research on the cure and early detection of diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's is becoming of great interest due to the increasing number of people affected by them every year. An accurate and quick detection of various damaging species is highly critical in treatments of such diseases not only for exploring possible cures but also for early detection. If these diseases are detected during the initial stages than the possibility of curing them is much higher. Motivated by this, many researchers today have developed numerous types of sensing devices that can detect various physiological and biological compounds. However, most of these sensors are enzyme based. They have several setbacks such as the lack of sensitivity, restricted selectivity, short shelf life, and biological fouling. To overcome these obstacles, we examine the use of nanoceria modified Pt and Au electrodes for the detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. Amperometric detection of glucose and hydrogen peroxide is critical for biological applications for diabetes and possible Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. This dissertation focuses on the exploration of non-enzymatic detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species which has the prospective to be used for biological applications, in addition to an investigation of an odor control technology that uses these reactive oxygen species for the treatment of wastewater plants. The combination of bi-metallic composites with nanoceria showed increased oxidation ability towards glucose and hydrogen peroxide. The following dissertation expands on the relationship between bi-metallic nanoceria composite materials and its electro-oxidation of glucose and hydrogen peroxide towards biological sensing along with an investigation of an odor control technology that utilizes generates hydroxyl radical fine particle mist for the degradation of hydrogen sulfide odor in wastewater treatment plants.
Identifier: CFE0005227 (IID), ucf:50585 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Chemistry
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Electrochemical sensors -- non-enzymatic sensor -- amperometric detection -- redox -- glucose -- reactive oxygen species -- hydrogen peroxide -- hydrogen sulfide -- odor -- ozone -- diabetes -- nanoceria -- ceria -- gold electrode -- platinum electrode -- hydroxyl radicals
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005227
Restrictions on Access: campus 2015-02-15
Host Institution: UCF

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