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The Design and Evaluation of a Video Game to Help Train Perspective-Taking and Empathy in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
This paper discusses the design, implementation, and evaluation of a serious game intended to reinforce applied behavior analysis (ABA) techniques used with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by providing a low cost and easily accessible supplement to traditional methods. Past and recent research strongly supports the use of computer assisted instruction in the education of individuals with ASD (Moore (&) Calvert, 2000; Noor, Shahbodin, (&) Pee, 2012). Computer games have been shown to boost confidence and provide calming mechanisms (Griffiths, 2003) while being a safe environment for social exploration and learning (Moore, Cheng, McGrath, (&) Powell, 2005). Games increase children's motivation and thus increase the rate of learning in computer mediated environments (Moore (&) Calvert, 2000). Furthermore, children with ASD are able to understand basic emotions and facial expressions in avatars more easily than in real-world interactions (Moore, Cheng, McGrath, (&) Powell, 2005).Perspective-taking (also known as role-taking) has been shown to be a crucial component and antecedent to empathy (Gomez-Becerra, Martin, Chavez-Brown, (&) Greer, 2007; Peng, Lee, (&) Heeter, 2010). Though symptoms vary across children with ASD, perspective-taking and empathy are abilities that have been shown to be limited across a wide spectrum of individuals with ASD and Asperger's disorder (Gomez-Becerra, Martin, Chavez-Brown, (&) Greer, 2007). A game called WUBeeS was developed to aid young children with ASD in perspective taking and empathy by placing the player in the role of a caregiver to a virtual avatar. It is hypothesized that through the playing of this game over a series of trials, children with ASD will show an increase in the ability to discriminate emotions, provide appropriate responses to basic needs (e.g. feeding the avatar when it is hungry), and be able to communicate more clearly about emotions.
Title: The Design and Evaluation of a Video Game to Help Train Perspective-Taking and Empathy in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
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Name(s): Hughes, Darin, Author
Vasquez, Eleazar, Committee Chair
Kincaid, John, Committee Member
Marino, Matthew, Committee Member
Lindgren, Robb, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This paper discusses the design, implementation, and evaluation of a serious game intended to reinforce applied behavior analysis (ABA) techniques used with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by providing a low cost and easily accessible supplement to traditional methods. Past and recent research strongly supports the use of computer assisted instruction in the education of individuals with ASD (Moore (&) Calvert, 2000; Noor, Shahbodin, (&) Pee, 2012). Computer games have been shown to boost confidence and provide calming mechanisms (Griffiths, 2003) while being a safe environment for social exploration and learning (Moore, Cheng, McGrath, (&) Powell, 2005). Games increase children's motivation and thus increase the rate of learning in computer mediated environments (Moore (&) Calvert, 2000). Furthermore, children with ASD are able to understand basic emotions and facial expressions in avatars more easily than in real-world interactions (Moore, Cheng, McGrath, (&) Powell, 2005).Perspective-taking (also known as role-taking) has been shown to be a crucial component and antecedent to empathy (Gomez-Becerra, Martin, Chavez-Brown, (&) Greer, 2007; Peng, Lee, (&) Heeter, 2010). Though symptoms vary across children with ASD, perspective-taking and empathy are abilities that have been shown to be limited across a wide spectrum of individuals with ASD and Asperger's disorder (Gomez-Becerra, Martin, Chavez-Brown, (&) Greer, 2007). A game called WUBeeS was developed to aid young children with ASD in perspective taking and empathy by placing the player in the role of a caregiver to a virtual avatar. It is hypothesized that through the playing of this game over a series of trials, children with ASD will show an increase in the ability to discriminate emotions, provide appropriate responses to basic needs (e.g. feeding the avatar when it is hungry), and be able to communicate more clearly about emotions.
Identifier: CFE0005184 (IID), ucf:50654 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Dean's Office GRDST
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Autism Spectrum Disorder -- Serious Games -- Simulation -- Empathy -- Social Skills Development -- STEM games -- Disabilities -- Perspective-Taking -- Asperger's -- Simulation -- Children with Autism
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005184
Restrictions on Access: public 2014-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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