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Deadly Premonition: Does Terrorist-Leader Psychology Influence Violence Lethality?

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
This thesis seeks to address a theoretical and empirical gap within terrorism studies, and more specially the study of terrorist-group lethality. This research updates a model of terrorist-group lethality by including terrorist-leader psychology as an individual-level variable in predicting terrorist-group lethality. Terrorist-leader statements were analyzed by using two novel coding schemes called Operational Code and Leadership Trait Analysis to create quantified measurements of leader cognitive beliefs and personality traits. The empirical portion of this study utilizes pooled cross-sectional time-series data within the framework of fixed effects and multi-level estimation models. The results find that terrorist-leader psychology, and more specifically Instrumental (Strategic) Beliefs and Distrust, are significant predictors of subsequent group-lethality.
Title: Deadly Premonition: Does Terrorist-Leader Psychology Influence Violence Lethality?.
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Name(s): Besaw, Clayton, Author
Schafer, Mark, Committee Chair
Jacques, Peter, Committee Member
Mousseau, Michael, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis seeks to address a theoretical and empirical gap within terrorism studies, and more specially the study of terrorist-group lethality. This research updates a model of terrorist-group lethality by including terrorist-leader psychology as an individual-level variable in predicting terrorist-group lethality. Terrorist-leader statements were analyzed by using two novel coding schemes called Operational Code and Leadership Trait Analysis to create quantified measurements of leader cognitive beliefs and personality traits. The empirical portion of this study utilizes pooled cross-sectional time-series data within the framework of fixed effects and multi-level estimation models. The results find that terrorist-leader psychology, and more specifically Instrumental (Strategic) Beliefs and Distrust, are significant predictors of subsequent group-lethality.
Identifier: CFE0005132 (IID), ucf:50679 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Terrorism -- Leadership -- Psychology -- Quantitative Methodology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005132
Restrictions on Access: public 2014-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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