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Investigating Personal Fitness Trainers' Qualifications

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
A threefold approach was utilized to analyze the problem of defining personal fitness trainers' qualifications. First, the problem was explored nationally, internationally and locally. Within the local context, the history of the exercise science program, stakeholders and culture at the University of Central Florida and in the central Florida marketplace was examined. Next, a systematic literature review examined possible causes within the knowledge context, learning/motivational context and organizational/cultural context. Then, an original research study investigated the qualifications for Central Florida, Personal Fitness Trainers (PFTs) by examining the relationship(s) and/or differences between variables such as education, certification, years of experience and income as well as attitudes, opinions and beliefs (AOBs) regarding those variables. An online questionnaire was emailed to 196 PFTs in the central Florida area and utilized to assess qualifications as they relate to income. The 48 PFT participants were compared based on education (ED), certification (CE), and experience (EX) and their effect on income. There were no statistically significant differences in 2012 income based on (ED) level, F(4,26) = 2.283, p=.086. The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) were the preferred (CE) companies (ranked 1st or 2nd, 65% and 45% of the time respectively). From the 48 PFTs that answered the survey, 54% of PFTs agreed (A) or strongly agreed (SA) that a degree should be required in order to practice, 73% (A) or (SA) that (CE) is helpful in gaining employment, and 66% (A) or (SA) that a national board exam or license should be required to practice. The least number of (ED) courses was taken in biomechanics and business marketing. In conclusion, PFT level of education and certification type does not significantly affect income given the current system. PFTs agree that more stringent guidelines are needed to limit entrance into the profession to those who are more qualified. The author presents a new model for undergraduate curriculum and instruction requiring hands on coursework, certification and internship or service learning project.
Title: Investigating Personal Fitness Trainers' Qualifications.
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Name(s): Akerson, Michael, Author
Boote, David, Committee Chair
Fisher, Thomas, Committee Member
Valdes, Anna, Committee Member
Vitale, Thomas, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: A threefold approach was utilized to analyze the problem of defining personal fitness trainers' qualifications. First, the problem was explored nationally, internationally and locally. Within the local context, the history of the exercise science program, stakeholders and culture at the University of Central Florida and in the central Florida marketplace was examined. Next, a systematic literature review examined possible causes within the knowledge context, learning/motivational context and organizational/cultural context. Then, an original research study investigated the qualifications for Central Florida, Personal Fitness Trainers (PFTs) by examining the relationship(s) and/or differences between variables such as education, certification, years of experience and income as well as attitudes, opinions and beliefs (AOBs) regarding those variables. An online questionnaire was emailed to 196 PFTs in the central Florida area and utilized to assess qualifications as they relate to income. The 48 PFT participants were compared based on education (ED), certification (CE), and experience (EX) and their effect on income. There were no statistically significant differences in 2012 income based on (ED) level, F(4,26) = 2.283, p=.086. The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) were the preferred (CE) companies (ranked 1st or 2nd, 65% and 45% of the time respectively). From the 48 PFTs that answered the survey, 54% of PFTs agreed (A) or strongly agreed (SA) that a degree should be required in order to practice, 73% (A) or (SA) that (CE) is helpful in gaining employment, and 66% (A) or (SA) that a national board exam or license should be required to practice. The least number of (ED) courses was taken in biomechanics and business marketing. In conclusion, PFT level of education and certification type does not significantly affect income given the current system. PFTs agree that more stringent guidelines are needed to limit entrance into the profession to those who are more qualified. The author presents a new model for undergraduate curriculum and instruction requiring hands on coursework, certification and internship or service learning project.
Identifier: CFE0005120 (IID), ucf:50684 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-05-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): fitness trainer and education -- fitness trainer and qualifications -- fitness trainer and income -- fitness trainer and curriculum
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005120
Restrictions on Access: public 2014-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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