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Intimate Partner Kidnapping: An Exploratory Analysis

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
The following study is an exploratory analysis of intimate partner kidnapping. The current study will give a descriptive picture of the victim, offender, and incident characteristics of a form of intimate partner violence that has never been studied before, intimate partner kidnapping, as well as a form of physical violence often seen in the literature, intimate partner assaults. The study will use a combination of the National Incident Based Report System (FBI, 2009), and the American Community Survey (Census, 2012) to identify these characteristics and also to identify any potential relationships between structural-level correlates and rates of intimate partner violence. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of multiple forms of intimate partner violence using police data, as well as, understand their relationships to structural-level correlates of counties. The current study uses the National Incident-Based Reporting (FBI, 2009) system from the year 2009 in order to identify both types of intimate partner violence. It is rare that police data is used to study intimate partner violence, and the current study expands our knowledge of this violence by using a different type of data to study this area. Additionally, the American Community Survey (Census, 2012) estimates between 2005-2009 are utilized to measure the structural-level variables, including concentrated disadvantage, racial heterogeneity, immigrant concentration, and residential stability. Overall, this study finds that intimate partner kidnapping is a different form of violence than intimate partner assaults. Only one structural level variable, residential stability is significantly associated with intimate partner kidnapping, whereas, 3 of the 4 structural level variables are significantly related to intimate partner assaults and most in the direction expected. The conclusions suggest that intimate partner kidnapping may be a part of (")coercive controlling violence(") which involves severe amounts of control, isolation, and intimidation, and may not have the same relationships to structural-level correlates as other types of intimate partner violence, such as physical assaults.
Title: Intimate Partner Kidnapping: An Exploratory Analysis.
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Name(s): Blumenstein, Lindsey, Author
Jasinski, Jana, Committee Chair
Corzine, Harold, Committee Member
Mustaine, Elizabeth, Committee Member
Rosky, Jeffrey, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The following study is an exploratory analysis of intimate partner kidnapping. The current study will give a descriptive picture of the victim, offender, and incident characteristics of a form of intimate partner violence that has never been studied before, intimate partner kidnapping, as well as a form of physical violence often seen in the literature, intimate partner assaults. The study will use a combination of the National Incident Based Report System (FBI, 2009), and the American Community Survey (Census, 2012) to identify these characteristics and also to identify any potential relationships between structural-level correlates and rates of intimate partner violence. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of multiple forms of intimate partner violence using police data, as well as, understand their relationships to structural-level correlates of counties. The current study uses the National Incident-Based Reporting (FBI, 2009) system from the year 2009 in order to identify both types of intimate partner violence. It is rare that police data is used to study intimate partner violence, and the current study expands our knowledge of this violence by using a different type of data to study this area. Additionally, the American Community Survey (Census, 2012) estimates between 2005-2009 are utilized to measure the structural-level variables, including concentrated disadvantage, racial heterogeneity, immigrant concentration, and residential stability. Overall, this study finds that intimate partner kidnapping is a different form of violence than intimate partner assaults. Only one structural level variable, residential stability is significantly associated with intimate partner kidnapping, whereas, 3 of the 4 structural level variables are significantly related to intimate partner assaults and most in the direction expected. The conclusions suggest that intimate partner kidnapping may be a part of (")coercive controlling violence(") which involves severe amounts of control, isolation, and intimidation, and may not have the same relationships to structural-level correlates as other types of intimate partner violence, such as physical assaults.
Identifier: CFE0005086 (IID), ucf:50743 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Sociology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): intimate partner violence -- kidnapping -- social disorganization theory
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005086
Restrictions on Access: public 2013-11-15
Host Institution: UCF

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