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OPTICAL PROPAGATION OF SELF-SUSTAINING WAVEFRONTS AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICS IN PARABOLIC MULTIMODE FIBERS

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
The aim of this thesis is to introduce my work which has generally been focused on opticalwavefronts that have the unusual property of resisting commonplace phenomena such as diffraction and dispersion. Interestingly, these special beams are found both in linear and nonlinear situations. For example, in the linear regime, localized spatio-temporal waves which resemble the spherical harmonic symmetries of the hydrogen quantum orbitals can simultaneously negotiate both diffractive and dispersiveeffects. In the nonlinear regime, dressed optical filaments can be arranged to propagate multi-photon produced plasma channels orders of magnitude longer than expected.The first portion of this dissertation will begin by surveying the history of diffraction-free beamsand introducing some of their mathematical treatments. Interjected throughout this discussion will be several relevant concepts which I explored during my first years a CREOL. The discussion will then be steered into a detailed account of diffraction/dispersion free wavefronts which display hydrogen-like symmetries. The second segment of the document will cover the highly nonlinear process of optical filamentation. This chapter will almost entirely investigate the idea of the dressed filament, an entity which allows for substantial prolongation of this light string. I will then conclude by delving into the topicof supercontinuum generation in parabolic multimode fibers which, in the upcoming years, has great potential of becoming important in optics.
Title: OPTICAL PROPAGATION OF SELF-SUSTAINING WAVEFRONTS AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICS IN PARABOLIC MULTIMODE FIBERS.
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Name(s): Mills, Matthew, Author
Christodoulides, Demetrios, Committee Chair
Hagan, David, Committee Member
Dogariu, Aristide, Committee Member
Kaup, David, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The aim of this thesis is to introduce my work which has generally been focused on opticalwavefronts that have the unusual property of resisting commonplace phenomena such as diffraction and dispersion. Interestingly, these special beams are found both in linear and nonlinear situations. For example, in the linear regime, localized spatio-temporal waves which resemble the spherical harmonic symmetries of the hydrogen quantum orbitals can simultaneously negotiate both diffractive and dispersiveeffects. In the nonlinear regime, dressed optical filaments can be arranged to propagate multi-photon produced plasma channels orders of magnitude longer than expected.The first portion of this dissertation will begin by surveying the history of diffraction-free beamsand introducing some of their mathematical treatments. Interjected throughout this discussion will be several relevant concepts which I explored during my first years a CREOL. The discussion will then be steered into a detailed account of diffraction/dispersion free wavefronts which display hydrogen-like symmetries. The second segment of the document will cover the highly nonlinear process of optical filamentation. This chapter will almost entirely investigate the idea of the dressed filament, an entity which allows for substantial prolongation of this light string. I will then conclude by delving into the topicof supercontinuum generation in parabolic multimode fibers which, in the upcoming years, has great potential of becoming important in optics.
Identifier: CFE0005977 (IID), ucf:50767 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-12-01
Ph.D.
Optics and Photonics, Optics and Photonics
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Optics -- Filamentation -- diffractionless -- wave propagation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005977
Restrictions on Access: public 2015-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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