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Women, Work, and Time: Food work politics of self defined healthy men

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
This study examined the way gender operates in relation to time within the food work spectrum discussed in 19 narratives. The 19 narratives came from individual open ended face-to-face interviews with self-defined healthy men who shop at healthy food stores. This study's examination of how gender operates in the narratives was based on how the men constructed their experiences with women and work in relation to time through the food work spectrum. Women mentioned in the sampled narratives taught the men how to shop and eat in a healthy manner but women still did the cooking. Work wise the findings split the men into two groups, the majority were the men who did not eat at work and the minority were the ones who did. Both of these sets of findings illuminate that how the men constructed their experiences of the food work spectrum depended on gendered relations of power.
Title: Women, Work, and Time: Food work politics of self defined healthy men.
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Name(s): Barredo, Juan, Author
Carter, Shannon, Committee Chair
Anthony, Amanda, Committee Member
Grauerholz, Liz, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study examined the way gender operates in relation to time within the food work spectrum discussed in 19 narratives. The 19 narratives came from individual open ended face-to-face interviews with self-defined healthy men who shop at healthy food stores. This study's examination of how gender operates in the narratives was based on how the men constructed their experiences with women and work in relation to time through the food work spectrum. Women mentioned in the sampled narratives taught the men how to shop and eat in a healthy manner but women still did the cooking. Work wise the findings split the men into two groups, the majority were the men who did not eat at work and the minority were the ones who did. Both of these sets of findings illuminate that how the men constructed their experiences of the food work spectrum depended on gendered relations of power.
Identifier: CFE0005922 (IID), ucf:50834 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-12-01
M.A.
Sciences, Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Masculinity -- gender -- health -- feminism
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005922
Restrictions on Access: public 2015-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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