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Les Temps Roulent: An Analysis of Emergency Medical and Police Response Times to Shootings and Lethality in New Orleans

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Lethality of aggravated assaults has long been discussed in terms of weapons used, location of assault, demographics of victims, and regions of the US in which the assault occurred. However, dating back to the 1950s, medical response times have been discussed as a mediating factor, but minimally explored in analyses. The current study assesses the lethality of shootings with a primary focus on emergency medical and police response times in New Orleans, LA. Along with routine activities and social disorganization indicators, 102 shootings that occurred in 3 months are analyzed to establish response time patterns of lethality. Results indicate that neither medical nor police response times impact the odds of a victim surviving a shooting, but instead, it is the days on which the violent encounters occur and the socioeconomic characteristics of the neighborhood that have a stronger influence on life or death, although not statistically significant. Limitations and future research directions are discussed.
Title: Les Temps Roulent: An Analysis of Emergency Medical and Police Response Times to Shootings and Lethality in New Orleans.
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Name(s): Sacra, Sarah, Author
Corzine, Harold, Committee Chair
Huff-Corzine, Lin, Committee CoChair
Gay, David, Committee Member
McCutcheon, James, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Lethality of aggravated assaults has long been discussed in terms of weapons used, location of assault, demographics of victims, and regions of the US in which the assault occurred. However, dating back to the 1950s, medical response times have been discussed as a mediating factor, but minimally explored in analyses. The current study assesses the lethality of shootings with a primary focus on emergency medical and police response times in New Orleans, LA. Along with routine activities and social disorganization indicators, 102 shootings that occurred in 3 months are analyzed to establish response time patterns of lethality. Results indicate that neither medical nor police response times impact the odds of a victim surviving a shooting, but instead, it is the days on which the violent encounters occur and the socioeconomic characteristics of the neighborhood that have a stronger influence on life or death, although not statistically significant. Limitations and future research directions are discussed.
Identifier: CFE0005881 (IID), ucf:50877 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): shootings -- homicide -- emergency medical services -- police -- response times -- lethality -- New Orleans -- firearms
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005881
Restrictions on Access: public 2015-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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