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Problematic Internet Use in Residence Halls

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
College students are at higher risk to develop problematic internet use (PIU) than the average person and that risk may negatively impact their college success. Since students with PIU are not violating policies, they are not being identified as having a problem through the student conduct process like other students with problems such as alcohol abuse. While research on PIU is still in its infancy, the research that has been conducted indicates that PIU is a growing problem with no agreed upon definition, diagnosis or treatment. The main purpose of this study was to determine the extent that PIU and PVP exists in residence halls on college campuses. The theoretical framework was the addiction syndrome theory (AST) and is the only current model that can be used to explain all addictions, including behavioral addictions which is the category of addiction the PIU falls under. The main measurement tool was the Young internet addiction test (IAT) which measures levels of online activity.The results of this study were inconclusive. There was a low correlation between online activity and academic performance as measured by academic probation. The weak relationship indicates that PIU may be an issue for college students and therefore may need to be considered when administrators are making policies. Whether the AST proves to be a valid conceptual framework for studying PIU and other addictions remains to be seen. The results here were inconclusive and therefore further research involving AST is needed before drawing any real conclusions.
Title: Problematic Internet Use in Residence Halls.
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Name(s): Quirk, Graham, Author
Cintron Delgado, Rosa, Committee Chair
Cox, Dr. Thomas, Committee Member
Owens, J. Thomas, Committee Member
Welch, Kerry, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: College students are at higher risk to develop problematic internet use (PIU) than the average person and that risk may negatively impact their college success. Since students with PIU are not violating policies, they are not being identified as having a problem through the student conduct process like other students with problems such as alcohol abuse. While research on PIU is still in its infancy, the research that has been conducted indicates that PIU is a growing problem with no agreed upon definition, diagnosis or treatment. The main purpose of this study was to determine the extent that PIU and PVP exists in residence halls on college campuses. The theoretical framework was the addiction syndrome theory (AST) and is the only current model that can be used to explain all addictions, including behavioral addictions which is the category of addiction the PIU falls under. The main measurement tool was the Young internet addiction test (IAT) which measures levels of online activity.The results of this study were inconclusive. There was a low correlation between online activity and academic performance as measured by academic probation. The weak relationship indicates that PIU may be an issue for college students and therefore may need to be considered when administrators are making policies. Whether the AST proves to be a valid conceptual framework for studying PIU and other addictions remains to be seen. The results here were inconclusive and therefore further research involving AST is needed before drawing any real conclusions.
Identifier: CFE0005867 (IID), ucf:50887 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-08-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Educational and Human Sciences
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Problematic Internet Use -- Addiction Syndrome Theory -- Residence Halls -- Addiction -- Higher Education
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005867
Restrictions on Access: public 2015-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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