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Who is the best judge of personality: Investigating the role of relationship depth and observational breadth on the accuracy of third-party ratings

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
To date, the vast majority of research regarding personality in IO Psychology has relied on self-report assessments. Despite support for the utility of third-party assessments, IO Psychologists have only just begun extensive research in this area. Connelly and Ones (2010) conducted a meta-analysis that demonstrated that accuracy of third-party ratings improved as intimacy between the judge and the target grew. This remained true with the exception of predicting behavioral criteria, where non-intimates maintained superior predictability (Connelly (&) Ones, 2010). This was later contradicted by a recent investigation that found the best predictive validity for third-party assessments when they are taken from personal acquaintances as opposed to work colleagues (Connelly (&) Hulsheger, 2012). The current study is intended to investigate how the depth of the relationship and breadth of behavioral observations differentially moderate the relationship between third-party personality assessments and accuracy criteria (i.e., self-other overlap, discriminant validity and behavior). Results indicate that both depth and breadth impact accuracy criteria and they do so differentially based on trait visibility and evaluativeness. These findings will be discussed along with practical implications and limitations of the following research.
Title: Who is the best judge of personality: Investigating the role of relationship depth and observational breadth on the accuracy of third-party ratings.
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Name(s): Tindall, Mitchell, Author
Jentsch, Kimberly, Committee Chair
Szalma, James, Committee Member
Wang, Wei, Committee Member
Piccolo, Ronald, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: To date, the vast majority of research regarding personality in IO Psychology has relied on self-report assessments. Despite support for the utility of third-party assessments, IO Psychologists have only just begun extensive research in this area. Connelly and Ones (2010) conducted a meta-analysis that demonstrated that accuracy of third-party ratings improved as intimacy between the judge and the target grew. This remained true with the exception of predicting behavioral criteria, where non-intimates maintained superior predictability (Connelly (&) Ones, 2010). This was later contradicted by a recent investigation that found the best predictive validity for third-party assessments when they are taken from personal acquaintances as opposed to work colleagues (Connelly (&) Hulsheger, 2012). The current study is intended to investigate how the depth of the relationship and breadth of behavioral observations differentially moderate the relationship between third-party personality assessments and accuracy criteria (i.e., self-other overlap, discriminant validity and behavior). Results indicate that both depth and breadth impact accuracy criteria and they do so differentially based on trait visibility and evaluativeness. These findings will be discussed along with practical implications and limitations of the following research.
Identifier: CFE0006014 (IID), ucf:51007 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-12-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Personality assessment -- Informant reports -- The Big Five -- Other-report accuracy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006014
Restrictions on Access: campus 2016-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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