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Food Insecurity, Social Inequality, and Social Policy

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
Research shows that food insecurity rates and experiences vary by subpopulation. This dissertation examines the rates and experience of food insecurity rates across subpopulationsusing a wide variety of sociodemographic factors expanding the current research on de terminants of food insecurity. Subtopics surrounding the current food insecurity research are explored. These topics include determinants of food deserts, SNAP (or food stamps) utilization, and household adaptation strategies. This research shows that current measurements of food insecurity lack the detail needed to understand why households are food insecure besides lacking income. Using Bourdieu's four forms of capital, this study considers factors beyond income tounderstand the determinants of food insecurity. Quantitative analyses utilize nationally representative data from the 2013 Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement, as well as representative food security data collected for Orange County, FL and state of Florida. Qualitative interviews were conducted to examine adaptation strategies of households with children. This research finds that a number of determinants besides income contribute to household food insecurity and encourages policymakers to move beyond income as the major determinant of food insecurity and consider other household and demographic characteristics as equally important to understanding the problem of food insecurity in the US.
Title: Food Insecurity, Social Inequality, and Social Policy.
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Name(s): Strickhouser, Sara, Author
Wright, James, Committee Chair
Jasinski, Jana, Committee Member
Gay, David, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research shows that food insecurity rates and experiences vary by subpopulation. This dissertation examines the rates and experience of food insecurity rates across subpopulationsusing a wide variety of sociodemographic factors expanding the current research on de terminants of food insecurity. Subtopics surrounding the current food insecurity research are explored. These topics include determinants of food deserts, SNAP (or food stamps) utilization, and household adaptation strategies. This research shows that current measurements of food insecurity lack the detail needed to understand why households are food insecure besides lacking income. Using Bourdieu's four forms of capital, this study considers factors beyond income tounderstand the determinants of food insecurity. Quantitative analyses utilize nationally representative data from the 2013 Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement, as well as representative food security data collected for Orange County, FL and state of Florida. Qualitative interviews were conducted to examine adaptation strategies of households with children. This research finds that a number of determinants besides income contribute to household food insecurity and encourages policymakers to move beyond income as the major determinant of food insecurity and consider other household and demographic characteristics as equally important to understanding the problem of food insecurity in the US.
Identifier: CFE0006186 (IID), ucf:51136 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Sociology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Food Insecurity -- Current Population Survey -- Food Desert
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006186
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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