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Afro-Caribbean Parental Influence: Family Chronicles of the Educational Journey From Child to Medical Student

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
Many ethnic groups in the United States have struggled for the opportunity to be identified as an individual group. In academia, these students are often aggregated into a larger category, with little acknowledgment for the difference in their cultural heritage. Along with these cultural differences, Afro-Caribbean parents and their children are met with other challenges in the pursuit of lifelong goals (Sowell, 1978). The decision to become a medical doctor is one that can often not be made alone. Using the framework of Cultural Ecological Theory and Social Construction (Ogbu 1990, 1992; Berger (&) Luckman, 1991) this study was conducted to determine whether Afro-Caribbean parents influence their children to become medical doctors. The research results in this qualitative study identified major themes, among others, to include: (1) collaborative efforts in pursuit of dreams and goals, (2) surpassing parental achievements and (3) the ability to cope with negative experiences. Afro-Caribbean parents, students, faculty and administrators in higher education can gain from the findings of this study, an awareness of the importance of trusted relationships and early exposure to health careers.
Title: Afro-Caribbean Parental Influence: Family Chronicles of the Educational Journey From Child to Medical Student.
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Name(s): Grant, Carlene, Author
Cintron Delgado, Rosa, Committee Chair
Owens, J. Thomas, Committee Member
Munyon, Matthew, Committee Member
Meehan, Kevin, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Many ethnic groups in the United States have struggled for the opportunity to be identified as an individual group. In academia, these students are often aggregated into a larger category, with little acknowledgment for the difference in their cultural heritage. Along with these cultural differences, Afro-Caribbean parents and their children are met with other challenges in the pursuit of lifelong goals (Sowell, 1978). The decision to become a medical doctor is one that can often not be made alone. Using the framework of Cultural Ecological Theory and Social Construction (Ogbu 1990, 1992; Berger (&) Luckman, 1991) this study was conducted to determine whether Afro-Caribbean parents influence their children to become medical doctors. The research results in this qualitative study identified major themes, among others, to include: (1) collaborative efforts in pursuit of dreams and goals, (2) surpassing parental achievements and (3) the ability to cope with negative experiences. Afro-Caribbean parents, students, faculty and administrators in higher education can gain from the findings of this study, an awareness of the importance of trusted relationships and early exposure to health careers.
Identifier: CFE0006110 (IID), ucf:51198 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-05-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Child, Family, and Community Sciences
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Afro-Caribbean -- parents -- children -- career -- medicine -- medical doctor -- diversity -- within group -- culture -- higher education
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006110
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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