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Understanding the Dynamics of Peer Review and Its Impact on Revision

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Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
Research in writing studies has focused on what happens as students, and often their teachers, talk about student writing. This line of inquiry has identified several strategies for productive peer interactions, including spontaneous talk (Danis; Dipardo and Freedman; Johnson, The New Frontier; Bruffee; Lam), a flexible environment (Dipardo (&) Freedman; Johnson, (")Friendly Persuasion(")), positive rapport (Rish; Thompson; Wolfe), feedback and support (Barron; Covill; Flynn; Grimm; Lam; Yucel, Bird, Young, and Blanksby; Zhu), and reflection (Yucel, Bird, Young, and Blanksby). However, research invested in understanding the extent to which such interactions result in better revisions or make students better writers has been slower to emerge. To address this gap in the existing scholarship, this thesis involved case studies of two first-year undergraduates as they navigated multiple peer review interactions throughout one semester of ENC 1101. Data collection for this inquiry included observations of three peer review sessions, retrospective interviews with each participant, and participants' end of semester e-portfolios. Using conversation analysis as a lens (Black; Ford and Thompson; Kerschbaum), this project explores the extent to which peer interactions inform students' revision of their writing. The analysis of the data suggests that the amount of interruptions and control during peer interactions influences the amount of comments a student takes up in the revision process. The results of conversation analysis identify a power structure within peer interactions that are developed and constantly changing. Those power structures also show the relationship between social interaction and revision. Teachers can use this study to motivate students to use the comments given during peer review toward revising their papers. Also, with the development of more diverse case studies, researchers would be able to identify if these phenomena show up more consistently.
Title: Understanding the Dynamics of Peer Review and Its Impact on Revision.
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Name(s): Kopp, Julie, Author
Roozen, Kevin, Committee Chair
Rounsaville, Angela, Committee Member
Hall, Mark, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research in writing studies has focused on what happens as students, and often their teachers, talk about student writing. This line of inquiry has identified several strategies for productive peer interactions, including spontaneous talk (Danis; Dipardo and Freedman; Johnson, The New Frontier; Bruffee; Lam), a flexible environment (Dipardo (&) Freedman; Johnson, (")Friendly Persuasion(")), positive rapport (Rish; Thompson; Wolfe), feedback and support (Barron; Covill; Flynn; Grimm; Lam; Yucel, Bird, Young, and Blanksby; Zhu), and reflection (Yucel, Bird, Young, and Blanksby). However, research invested in understanding the extent to which such interactions result in better revisions or make students better writers has been slower to emerge. To address this gap in the existing scholarship, this thesis involved case studies of two first-year undergraduates as they navigated multiple peer review interactions throughout one semester of ENC 1101. Data collection for this inquiry included observations of three peer review sessions, retrospective interviews with each participant, and participants' end of semester e-portfolios. Using conversation analysis as a lens (Black; Ford and Thompson; Kerschbaum), this project explores the extent to which peer interactions inform students' revision of their writing. The analysis of the data suggests that the amount of interruptions and control during peer interactions influences the amount of comments a student takes up in the revision process. The results of conversation analysis identify a power structure within peer interactions that are developed and constantly changing. Those power structures also show the relationship between social interaction and revision. Teachers can use this study to motivate students to use the comments given during peer review toward revising their papers. Also, with the development of more diverse case studies, researchers would be able to identify if these phenomena show up more consistently.
Identifier: CFE0006613 (IID), ucf:51284 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-05-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, Writing and Rhetoric
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): peer review -- interaction -- writing -- rhetoric -- composition -- conversation analysis -- revision -- pedagogy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006613
Restrictions on Access: campus 2018-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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