You are here

Habitat selection in transformed landscapes and the role of novel ecosystems for native species persistence

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
To understand native species persistence in transformed landscapes we must evaluate how individual behaviors interact with landscape structure through ecological processes such as habitat selection. Rapid, widespread landscape transformation may lead to a mismatch between habitat preference and quality, a phenomenon known as ecological traps that can have negative outcomes for populations. I applied this framework to the study of birds inhabiting landscapes dominated by forest remnants and shade coffee plantations, a tropical agroforestry system that retains important portions of native biodiversity. I used two different approaches to answer the question: What is the role of habitat selection in the adaptation of native species to transformed landscapes? First, I present the results of a simulation model used to evaluate the effects of landscape structure on population dynamics of a hypothetical species under two mechanisms of habitat selection. Then I present the analyses of seven years of capture-mark-recapture and resight data collected to compare habitat preference and quality between shade coffee and forest for twelve resident bird species in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (Colombia). I provide evidence for the importance of including the landscape context in the evaluation of ecological traps and for using long-term demographic data when evaluating the potential of novel ecosystems and intermediately-modified habitats for biodiversity conservation. Beyond suggestions to improve bird conservation in shade coffee, my findings contribute to theory about ecological traps and can be applied to understand population processes in a wide variety of heterogeneous landscapes.
Title: Habitat selection in transformed landscapes and the role of novel ecosystems for native species persistence.
17 views
14 downloads
Name(s): Sanchez Clavijo, Lina, Author
Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro, Committee Chair
Noss, Reed, Committee Member
Weishampel, John, Committee Member
Rodewald, Amanda, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: To understand native species persistence in transformed landscapes we must evaluate how individual behaviors interact with landscape structure through ecological processes such as habitat selection. Rapid, widespread landscape transformation may lead to a mismatch between habitat preference and quality, a phenomenon known as ecological traps that can have negative outcomes for populations. I applied this framework to the study of birds inhabiting landscapes dominated by forest remnants and shade coffee plantations, a tropical agroforestry system that retains important portions of native biodiversity. I used two different approaches to answer the question: What is the role of habitat selection in the adaptation of native species to transformed landscapes? First, I present the results of a simulation model used to evaluate the effects of landscape structure on population dynamics of a hypothetical species under two mechanisms of habitat selection. Then I present the analyses of seven years of capture-mark-recapture and resight data collected to compare habitat preference and quality between shade coffee and forest for twelve resident bird species in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (Colombia). I provide evidence for the importance of including the landscape context in the evaluation of ecological traps and for using long-term demographic data when evaluating the potential of novel ecosystems and intermediately-modified habitats for biodiversity conservation. Beyond suggestions to improve bird conservation in shade coffee, my findings contribute to theory about ecological traps and can be applied to understand population processes in a wide variety of heterogeneous landscapes.
Identifier: CFE0006494 (IID), ucf:51392 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-12-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Biology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): ecological and perceptual traps -- habitat preference -- habitat quality -- habitat selection -- habitat-specific demography -- landscape ecology -- novel ecosystems -- population modeling -- resident birds -- shade coffee -- tropical agroforestry systems -- tropical pre-montane forests
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006494
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections