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Job Satisfaction of Full-Time Faculty Members at a For-Profit University

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
The focus of this research was to gain an understanding of the levels of job satisfaction of full-time faculty members at a for-profit university. There has been a paucity in the study of job satisfaction for faculty working in this sector of higher education (Kinser, 2006). Job satisfaction was measured by using the Job Descriptive Index (Stanton, Sinar, Balzer (&) Smith, 2002a) within the conceptual framework of faculty job satisfaction developed by Hagedorn (2000). The facets selected for study were: the work itself, salary, advancement, administration, and collegial relationships. The findings indicated that the job-satisfaction facets with the highest scores were administration and collegial relationships. The facets with the lowest scores were salary and advancement. Because these results were generally contrary to the scholarly literature on this topic, one primary recommendation was to continue this line of research using qualitative as well as quantitative methods.
Title: Job Satisfaction of Full-Time Faculty Members at a For-Profit University.
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Name(s): Leck, Joanna, Author
Cintron Delgado, Rosa, Committee Chair
Owens, J. Thomas, Committee Member
Preston, Michael, Committee Member
Molina, Olga, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The focus of this research was to gain an understanding of the levels of job satisfaction of full-time faculty members at a for-profit university. There has been a paucity in the study of job satisfaction for faculty working in this sector of higher education (Kinser, 2006). Job satisfaction was measured by using the Job Descriptive Index (Stanton, Sinar, Balzer (&) Smith, 2002a) within the conceptual framework of faculty job satisfaction developed by Hagedorn (2000). The facets selected for study were: the work itself, salary, advancement, administration, and collegial relationships. The findings indicated that the job-satisfaction facets with the highest scores were administration and collegial relationships. The facets with the lowest scores were salary and advancement. Because these results were generally contrary to the scholarly literature on this topic, one primary recommendation was to continue this line of research using qualitative as well as quantitative methods.
Identifier: CFE0006470 (IID), ucf:51427 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-12-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Child, Family, and Community Sciences
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): faculty -- higher education -- job satisfaction -- for-profit
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006470
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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