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Design of surface chemical reactivity and optical properties in glasses

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
Thermal poling is a technique which involves the application of a strong DC electric field to a glass substrate heated below its glass transition temperature (Tg). Following the treatment, a static electric field is frozen inside the glass matrix, effectively breaking its centrosymmetry. Historically, this treatment has been used as a way to gain access to second order non-linear optical properties in glasses. However, recent efforts have shown that the treatment was responsible for structural changes as well as surface property modifications. Our study was focused on using this technique to tailor surface properties in oxide (borosilicate and niobium borophosphate) and chalcogenide glasses. A strong emphasis was put on trying to control all changes at the micrometric scale. After poling, property changes were assessed using a set of characterization tools: the Maker fringes technique (a Second Harmonic Generation ellipsometry technique), micro-Second Harmonic Generation ((&)#181;-SHG), vibrational spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Surface reactivity in borosilicate glasses was effectively changed while in niobium borophosphate and chalcogenide glasses, the optical properties were controlled linearly and nonlinearly. Finally, property changes were effectively controlled at the micrometric scale. This opens up new applications of thermal poling as a mean to design glass substrate for integrated photonics and lab-on-a-chip devices.
Title: Design of surface chemical reactivity and optical properties in glasses.
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Name(s): Lepicard, Antoine, Author
Richardson, Kathleen, Committee Chair
Seal, Sudipta, Committee Member
Gaume, Romain, Committee Member
Dussauze, Marc, Committee Member
Kuebler, Stephen, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Thermal poling is a technique which involves the application of a strong DC electric field to a glass substrate heated below its glass transition temperature (Tg). Following the treatment, a static electric field is frozen inside the glass matrix, effectively breaking its centrosymmetry. Historically, this treatment has been used as a way to gain access to second order non-linear optical properties in glasses. However, recent efforts have shown that the treatment was responsible for structural changes as well as surface property modifications. Our study was focused on using this technique to tailor surface properties in oxide (borosilicate and niobium borophosphate) and chalcogenide glasses. A strong emphasis was put on trying to control all changes at the micrometric scale. After poling, property changes were assessed using a set of characterization tools: the Maker fringes technique (a Second Harmonic Generation ellipsometry technique), micro-Second Harmonic Generation ((&)#181;-SHG), vibrational spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Surface reactivity in borosilicate glasses was effectively changed while in niobium borophosphate and chalcogenide glasses, the optical properties were controlled linearly and nonlinearly. Finally, property changes were effectively controlled at the micrometric scale. This opens up new applications of thermal poling as a mean to design glass substrate for integrated photonics and lab-on-a-chip devices.
Identifier: CFE0006471 (IID), ucf:51435 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-12-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Materials Science Engineering
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): oxide glasses -- chalcogenide glasses -- thermal poling -- second harmonic generation -- surface reactivity -- refractive index gradient
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006471
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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