You are here

The Effects of Tactile Displays on the Perception of Target Distance

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
Because vital information can be missed by Soldiers in combat environments that tax the eyes and the ears, it is imperative that alternative techniques be investigated to determine their potential in relaying this information in an effective way. This research investigated the use of a tactile display for providing distance and azimuth information about enemy targets. In a series of three experiments, participants were asked to engage enemy targets while utilizing cues that provided location information. In Experiment 1, two tactile cueing techniques (i.e., varying intensity and varying pulse rate) and three auditory cueing techniques (i.e., non-spatial speech, varying frequency of 3-D tones, and varying pulse rate of 3-D tones) were used to provide distance and azimuth information about enemy targets. Findings indicated that more participants preferred the tactile pulse cue and the non-spatial speech cue. There were no significant differences in performance among the tactile and the auditory cues, respectively. However, both the tactile cue types resulted in better performance and lower mental workload than the three auditory cue types. In Experiment 2, performance was investigated among the preferred tactile pulse cue and the non-spatial speech cue as well as a tactile direction only cue (i.e., no distance information), a visual cue, and a no cueing control. Findings indicated that both the tactile cue types resulted in better performance and lower mental workload than the other cue conditions. Experiment 3, was a multimodal investigation in which performance was investigated among combinations of the non-spatial speech, visual, and tactile pulse cues employed in Experiment 2. Findings indicated that cue combinations that included the tactile pulse cue resulted in better performance and lower mental workload than the cue combination without the tactile pulse cue. Overall, the findings support the notion of employing tactile displays as a communication means to provide azimuth and distance information to Soldiers about enemy targets, either as a unimodal cue or in concert with other cue types.
Title: The Effects of Tactile Displays on the Perception of Target Distance.
14 views
8 downloads
Name(s): White, Timothy, Author
Hancock, Peter, Committee Chair
Mouloua, Mustapha, Committee Member
Szalma, James, Committee Member
Rupert, Angus, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Because vital information can be missed by Soldiers in combat environments that tax the eyes and the ears, it is imperative that alternative techniques be investigated to determine their potential in relaying this information in an effective way. This research investigated the use of a tactile display for providing distance and azimuth information about enemy targets. In a series of three experiments, participants were asked to engage enemy targets while utilizing cues that provided location information. In Experiment 1, two tactile cueing techniques (i.e., varying intensity and varying pulse rate) and three auditory cueing techniques (i.e., non-spatial speech, varying frequency of 3-D tones, and varying pulse rate of 3-D tones) were used to provide distance and azimuth information about enemy targets. Findings indicated that more participants preferred the tactile pulse cue and the non-spatial speech cue. There were no significant differences in performance among the tactile and the auditory cues, respectively. However, both the tactile cue types resulted in better performance and lower mental workload than the three auditory cue types. In Experiment 2, performance was investigated among the preferred tactile pulse cue and the non-spatial speech cue as well as a tactile direction only cue (i.e., no distance information), a visual cue, and a no cueing control. Findings indicated that both the tactile cue types resulted in better performance and lower mental workload than the other cue conditions. Experiment 3, was a multimodal investigation in which performance was investigated among combinations of the non-spatial speech, visual, and tactile pulse cues employed in Experiment 2. Findings indicated that cue combinations that included the tactile pulse cue resulted in better performance and lower mental workload than the cue combination without the tactile pulse cue. Overall, the findings support the notion of employing tactile displays as a communication means to provide azimuth and distance information to Soldiers about enemy targets, either as a unimodal cue or in concert with other cue types.
Identifier: CFE0006418 (IID), ucf:51450 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Tactile -- Multimodal -- Cueing -- Distance -- Dismounted
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006418
Restrictions on Access: campus 2019-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections