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The Lived Experiences of Elementary Students with Disabilities Self-Advocating Through Speaking and Writing

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
Writing and self-advocacy skills are important for all students, including individuals with disabilities. Within the K-12 setting, those skills are taught, but emphasis changes as students progress through the grade levels. At the elementary level, writing is more prominent; whereas, in high school, self-advocacy becomes a focus. In this study, the researcher used a phenomenological research design to explore the lived experiences and preferences of elementary students with disabilities and their use of self-advocacy strategies in the inclusive setting, both in writing and speaking. The phenomenon was explored over an eleven-week period in a second grade, inclusive classroom. The conceptual framework for the study was the theoretical framework of self-advocacy by Test, Fowler, Wood, Brewer, and Eddy (2005). The child development of Piaget (1964) and disability theory of Tashakkaori and Teddlie (2003) served as secondary frameworks. The data collected are reflective of the self-advocacy experiences and preferences of two students with disabilities, their parents and classroom teacher. The themes of knowledge of self, knowledge of rights, effective communication skills, and leadership skills are discussed in detail. Implications for practice within the elementary classroom and recommendations for future research for students with disabilities in the inclusive environment are provided.
Title: The Lived Experiences of Elementary Students with Disabilities Self-Advocating Through Speaking and Writing.
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Name(s): Massengale, Lindsey, Author
Dieker, Lisa, Committee Chair
Pearl, Cynthia, Committee Member
Vasquez, Eleazar, Committee Member
Zygouris-Coe, Vassiliki, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Writing and self-advocacy skills are important for all students, including individuals with disabilities. Within the K-12 setting, those skills are taught, but emphasis changes as students progress through the grade levels. At the elementary level, writing is more prominent; whereas, in high school, self-advocacy becomes a focus. In this study, the researcher used a phenomenological research design to explore the lived experiences and preferences of elementary students with disabilities and their use of self-advocacy strategies in the inclusive setting, both in writing and speaking. The phenomenon was explored over an eleven-week period in a second grade, inclusive classroom. The conceptual framework for the study was the theoretical framework of self-advocacy by Test, Fowler, Wood, Brewer, and Eddy (2005). The child development of Piaget (1964) and disability theory of Tashakkaori and Teddlie (2003) served as secondary frameworks. The data collected are reflective of the self-advocacy experiences and preferences of two students with disabilities, their parents and classroom teacher. The themes of knowledge of self, knowledge of rights, effective communication skills, and leadership skills are discussed in detail. Implications for practice within the elementary classroom and recommendations for future research for students with disabilities in the inclusive environment are provided.
Identifier: CFE0006351 (IID), ucf:51565 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-08-01
Ph.D.
Education and Human Performance, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): students with disabilities -- elementary school -- self-advocacy -- writing -- speaking
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006351
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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