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A Multiple Case Study Examining How Third-Grade Students Who Struggle in Mathematics Make Sense of Fraction Concepts

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
A qualitative multiple case study was conducted to reveal the sense-making processes third-grade students who struggle in mathematics used to build an understanding of fraction concepts. Purposive sampling identified three participants who were struggling in a local school's third grade mathematics classes. This research describes how these participants made sense of fraction concepts through their strengths and struggles while engaged in 15 small-group intervention sessions. Vygotsky's (1934/1986/2012) theory that children's optimal learning is supported by teacher-student interactions was used as an interpretive framework. Tasks were developed over the course of the intervention sessions with consideration of a model developed by Lesh, Post, and Behr (1987) for connecting mathematical representations and the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (&) Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010). Data, including transcripts, tapes, and artifacts, were analyzed using two frameworks. These were Geary's (2003) classification of three subtypes of learning disabilities in mathematics and Anghileri's (2006) descriptions of social-constructivist scaffolding techniques. The first analysis resulted in a description of each participant's strengths and struggles, including alignment with Geary's subtypes, and how these strengths and struggles interacted with participant's construction of knowledge about fractions. The second analysis described episodes of learning that were supported by social-constructivist scaffolding techniques and revealed how participants made sense of fractions through their interactions with each other, the researcher, and intervention tasks. The researcher found that each participant's learning process, including struggles, was unique, with each interacting in different ways with tasks, manipulatives, pictorial representations, and questioning. For each participant, however, scaffolding techniques oriented around prompting and probing questions, participant verbalizations, and interactions with connected fraction representations were critical in their learning process.
Title: A Multiple Case Study Examining How Third-Grade Students Who Struggle in Mathematics Make Sense of Fraction Concepts.
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Name(s): Gault, Rebecca, Author
Ortiz, Enrique, Committee Chair
Dixon, Juli, Committee Member
Nickels, Megan, Committee Member
Little, Mary, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: A qualitative multiple case study was conducted to reveal the sense-making processes third-grade students who struggle in mathematics used to build an understanding of fraction concepts. Purposive sampling identified three participants who were struggling in a local school's third grade mathematics classes. This research describes how these participants made sense of fraction concepts through their strengths and struggles while engaged in 15 small-group intervention sessions. Vygotsky's (1934/1986/2012) theory that children's optimal learning is supported by teacher-student interactions was used as an interpretive framework. Tasks were developed over the course of the intervention sessions with consideration of a model developed by Lesh, Post, and Behr (1987) for connecting mathematical representations and the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (&) Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010). Data, including transcripts, tapes, and artifacts, were analyzed using two frameworks. These were Geary's (2003) classification of three subtypes of learning disabilities in mathematics and Anghileri's (2006) descriptions of social-constructivist scaffolding techniques. The first analysis resulted in a description of each participant's strengths and struggles, including alignment with Geary's subtypes, and how these strengths and struggles interacted with participant's construction of knowledge about fractions. The second analysis described episodes of learning that were supported by social-constructivist scaffolding techniques and revealed how participants made sense of fractions through their interactions with each other, the researcher, and intervention tasks. The researcher found that each participant's learning process, including struggles, was unique, with each interacting in different ways with tasks, manipulatives, pictorial representations, and questioning. For each participant, however, scaffolding techniques oriented around prompting and probing questions, participant verbalizations, and interactions with connected fraction representations were critical in their learning process.
Identifier: CFE0006307 (IID), ucf:51587 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-08-01
Ph.D.
Education and Human Performance, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): fractions -- conceptual learning -- students who struggle -- learning disabilities in mathematics -- scaffolding -- elementary mathematics -- social constructivism
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006307
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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