You are here

INVESTIGATING THE MODERATING EFFECTS OF OPTIMISM, HOPE, AND GRATITUDE ON THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG NEGATIVE LIFE EVENTS AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND LIFE SATISFACTION

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
The literature has documented that negative life events such as divorce, financial issues, or relationship changes lead to various psychological concerns including depression, anxiety, or suicidal behaviors. However, several variables affect how people cope with negative life events. Among those variables, optimism, hope, and gratitude have been emphasized in the literature, and their relationships with several psychological outcomes have been studied. However, little is known about the effects of these variables on negative life events and their relationship to psychological distress and life satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between negative life events and psychological distress and life satisfaction. This study also examined the moderating effects of optimism, hope, and gratitude on negative life events' prediction of psychological distress and life satisfaction. This investigation tested the theoretical model that negative life events predicted psychological distress and life satisfaction in undergraduate students (N = 738). In addition, this investigation tested three theoretical interaction models that optimism, hope and gratitude moderated the relationships between negative life events and psychological distress and life satisfaction. The results revealed that negative life events predicted psychological distress and life satisfaction. Regarding moderating effects, optimism hope, and gratitude moderated negative life events' prediction of psychological distress, but not life satisfaction. These results are consistent with the existing literature on negative life events. The results and limitations are discussed along with suggestions for future research. Implications are presented for college counselors and counselor educators.
Title: INVESTIGATING THE MODERATING EFFECTS OF OPTIMISM, HOPE, AND GRATITUDE ON THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG NEGATIVE LIFE EVENTS AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND LIFE SATISFACTION.
19 views
12 downloads
Name(s): Gungor, Abdi, Author
Young, Mark, Committee Chair
Sivo, Stephen, Committee CoChair
Barden, Sejal, Committee Member
Munyon, Matthew, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The literature has documented that negative life events such as divorce, financial issues, or relationship changes lead to various psychological concerns including depression, anxiety, or suicidal behaviors. However, several variables affect how people cope with negative life events. Among those variables, optimism, hope, and gratitude have been emphasized in the literature, and their relationships with several psychological outcomes have been studied. However, little is known about the effects of these variables on negative life events and their relationship to psychological distress and life satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between negative life events and psychological distress and life satisfaction. This study also examined the moderating effects of optimism, hope, and gratitude on negative life events' prediction of psychological distress and life satisfaction. This investigation tested the theoretical model that negative life events predicted psychological distress and life satisfaction in undergraduate students (N = 738). In addition, this investigation tested three theoretical interaction models that optimism, hope and gratitude moderated the relationships between negative life events and psychological distress and life satisfaction. The results revealed that negative life events predicted psychological distress and life satisfaction. Regarding moderating effects, optimism hope, and gratitude moderated negative life events' prediction of psychological distress, but not life satisfaction. These results are consistent with the existing literature on negative life events. The results and limitations are discussed along with suggestions for future research. Implications are presented for college counselors and counselor educators.
Identifier: CFE0006313 (IID), ucf:51611 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-08-01
Ph.D.
Education and Human Performance, Dean's Office EDUC
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Negative Life Events -- Psychological Distress -- Optimism -- Hope -- Gratitude -- Positive Psychology -- Coping -- Counseling
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006313
Restrictions on Access: public 2016-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections