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Attitudinal Trends in Support for Police Use of Force Before and After Ferguson

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Since the 2014 death of an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown by a white Fergusonpolice officer, there has been a string of similar incidents that have occurred in a relatively shortperiod of time. These high profile incidents of police officers using questionable amounts offorce have shaken public trust in law enforcement. Studies have shown that public confidence inlaw enforcement often erodes drastically following heavily publicized, controversial mediareports of police misconduct (Tuch and Weitzer 1997; Weitzer 2002). The current levels ofpublic outrage in response to allegations of police brutality have surpassed the levels of outragethat followed similar, highly publicized incidents in previous decades (Lawrence 2000; Weitzer2015). Scholar suggest that recent events, may have a longer-term impact than those in previousdecades (Lawrence 2000; Weitzer 2002). This study seeks to extend the current literature oncitizens' interpretations of police violence and how, if at all it is impacted by highly-publicizedincident of police misconduct. Specifically, the current research uses a national sample tocompare citizens' endorsement of police use of force before and after the 2014 death of MichaelBrown. Overall, the results from a series of logistic regression analyses found that publicattitudes toward police use of force are multifaceted and are shaped by a variety of individualand contextual level variables. Race/ethnicity was determined to be the strongest predictor ofcitizens' endorsement for police violence. It was also revealed that attitudinal support variesdepending on the situational-context surrounding police/citizen interactions.
Title: Attitudinal Trends in Support for Police Use of Force Before and After Ferguson.
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Name(s): Dennison, TaShanda, Author
Donley, Amy, Committee Chair
Reckdenwald, Amy, Committee Member
Gay, David, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Since the 2014 death of an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown by a white Fergusonpolice officer, there has been a string of similar incidents that have occurred in a relatively shortperiod of time. These high profile incidents of police officers using questionable amounts offorce have shaken public trust in law enforcement. Studies have shown that public confidence inlaw enforcement often erodes drastically following heavily publicized, controversial mediareports of police misconduct (Tuch and Weitzer 1997; Weitzer 2002). The current levels ofpublic outrage in response to allegations of police brutality have surpassed the levels of outragethat followed similar, highly publicized incidents in previous decades (Lawrence 2000; Weitzer2015). Scholar suggest that recent events, may have a longer-term impact than those in previousdecades (Lawrence 2000; Weitzer 2002). This study seeks to extend the current literature oncitizens' interpretations of police violence and how, if at all it is impacted by highly-publicizedincident of police misconduct. Specifically, the current research uses a national sample tocompare citizens' endorsement of police use of force before and after the 2014 death of MichaelBrown. Overall, the results from a series of logistic regression analyses found that publicattitudes toward police use of force are multifaceted and are shaped by a variety of individualand contextual level variables. Race/ethnicity was determined to be the strongest predictor ofcitizens' endorsement for police violence. It was also revealed that attitudinal support variesdepending on the situational-context surrounding police/citizen interactions.
Identifier: CFE0006992 (IID), ucf:51616 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): police use of force -- race -- class -- gender
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006992
Restrictions on Access: public 2018-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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