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Examining Energetic and Structural Components of Knowledge of Result Using a Vigilance Paradigm

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Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
Vigilance, or the ability to maintain attention to stimuli over a prolonged period of time (Davies (&) Parasuraman, 1982; Warm (&) Jerison, 1984), has been a troublesome research topic since World War II. Scientists have sought to counteract performance declines in vigilance tasks by training observers on these tasks. Though an extensive literature has been developed to examine the effectiveness of these techniques, the mechanisms by which many forms of vigilance training help performance are largely unknown. The present dissertation seeks to further the understanding of how two forms of training for vigilance, practice and knowledge of result, function to improve observers' ability to remain vigilant as time on task increases. In addition to understanding these forms of training, this dissertation seeks to develop a training protocol that would train observers for vigilance without adversely affecting their cognitive resources. Finally, this dissertation utilizes this new training protocol to examine the potential for transfer of training, which has been a question for vigilance researchers for decades. Results relating to these three research questions are presented, as well as a discussion of how these results may inform or influence vigilance research in the future.
Title: Examining Energetic and Structural Components of Knowledge of Result Using a Vigilance Paradigm.
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Name(s): Fraulini, Nicholas, Author
Szalma, James, Committee Chair
Mouloua, Mustapha, Committee Member
Hancock, Peter, Committee Member
Matthews, Gerald, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Vigilance, or the ability to maintain attention to stimuli over a prolonged period of time (Davies (&) Parasuraman, 1982; Warm (&) Jerison, 1984), has been a troublesome research topic since World War II. Scientists have sought to counteract performance declines in vigilance tasks by training observers on these tasks. Though an extensive literature has been developed to examine the effectiveness of these techniques, the mechanisms by which many forms of vigilance training help performance are largely unknown. The present dissertation seeks to further the understanding of how two forms of training for vigilance, practice and knowledge of result, function to improve observers' ability to remain vigilant as time on task increases. In addition to understanding these forms of training, this dissertation seeks to develop a training protocol that would train observers for vigilance without adversely affecting their cognitive resources. Finally, this dissertation utilizes this new training protocol to examine the potential for transfer of training, which has been a question for vigilance researchers for decades. Results relating to these three research questions are presented, as well as a discussion of how these results may inform or influence vigilance research in the future.
Identifier: CFE0006876 (IID), ucf:51746 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-12-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Vigilance -- Sustained Attention -- Training -- Mental Workload -- Stress
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006876
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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