You are here

Improving Instructional Strategies in Higher Education for Students with a Learning Disability in a General Education Science Course

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
This Dissertation in Practice employed a mixed-methods design to identify preferred instructional methods in a college level science course as well as the self-reported challenges to learning science in college by students with a learning disability. In addition, the relationships between preferred instructional strategies and learner characteristics such as declared major, and learning disability were examined. Qualitative and quantitative data was collected from a sample of 48 participants using an electronic survey. Additionally, eight participants participated in focus groups to collect in-depth qualitative data. All participants are current students enrolled full-time at Beacon College. Each participant completed a science college course and has a diagnosed learning disability. Analysis of the data demonstrated hands-on instruction guided by the instructor is the preferred method of learning and the use of traditional lecture and cooperative learning are self-reported as being least helpful to this student population to learn science. Findings from this study were provided to Beacon College to shape instruction in science courses as well as to shape recommendations for future research activities. Intentional design of instruction following the recommendations found in this study should assist in increasing student performance in college science courses as well as increase engagement to science as a process and field of study.
Title: Improving Instructional Strategies in Higher Education for Students with a Learning Disability in a General Education Science Course.
0 views
0 downloads
Name(s): Ogle, Brian, Author
Cox, Dr. Thomas, Committee Chair
Vitale, Thomas, Committee Member
Campbell, Laurie, Committee Member
Chandler, Shelly, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This Dissertation in Practice employed a mixed-methods design to identify preferred instructional methods in a college level science course as well as the self-reported challenges to learning science in college by students with a learning disability. In addition, the relationships between preferred instructional strategies and learner characteristics such as declared major, and learning disability were examined. Qualitative and quantitative data was collected from a sample of 48 participants using an electronic survey. Additionally, eight participants participated in focus groups to collect in-depth qualitative data. All participants are current students enrolled full-time at Beacon College. Each participant completed a science college course and has a diagnosed learning disability. Analysis of the data demonstrated hands-on instruction guided by the instructor is the preferred method of learning and the use of traditional lecture and cooperative learning are self-reported as being least helpful to this student population to learn science. Findings from this study were provided to Beacon College to shape instruction in science courses as well as to shape recommendations for future research activities. Intentional design of instruction following the recommendations found in this study should assist in increasing student performance in college science courses as well as increase engagement to science as a process and field of study.
Identifier: CFE0006772 (IID), ucf:51836 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-08-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Teach Learn and Ldrshp, Schl of
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): instruction -- science education -- learning disability -- higher education
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006772
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections