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Creating a Digital Exhibit on the Colonial Fur Trade in Florida: A Public History / Digital History Project

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Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
This thesis project incorporates podcasts and high resolution digital imagery visualizations into a single online exhibit to democratize archival material on the web. It employs contemporary new museology and digital history methodological frameworks, and utilizes the burgeoning medium of podcasting to increase public understanding and interaction with an historical period. For this project I have partnered with the Florida Historical Society and have utilized original materials from their collection relating to the colonial fur trade in Florida. The study of the North American fur trade has recently expanded to include more information about the indigenous societies engaged in the trade through closer examination of primary source documents, and this digital exhibit, hosted by the Florida Historical Society, created a series of module entities to achieve that end. The exhibit consists of three sections, each exploring a different aspect of the traditional discourse surrounding the colonial American fur trade in Florida, including the voices of indigenous populations and their agency in trade negotiations. Each podcast has aired as part of the Florida Historical Society's weekly radio magazine, Florida Frontiers, which is broadcast throughout the state, and is archived on the Society's website. The exhibit enhances the scholarly discussion on public history and digital history, while utilizing new media such as podcasts and interactive digital maps to create a more immersive user experience with primary source material to answer questions concerning the colonial fur trade in Florida. The project has combined new mediums of historical interpretation with traditional museum methodology and historical analysis to create a multi-faceted, unique digital experience on the web.
Title: Creating a Digital Exhibit on the Colonial Fur Trade in Florida: A Public History / Digital History Project.
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Name(s): DiBiase, Benjamin, Author
Cassanello, Robert, Committee Chair
Beiler, Rosalind, Committee Member
French, Scot, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis project incorporates podcasts and high resolution digital imagery visualizations into a single online exhibit to democratize archival material on the web. It employs contemporary new museology and digital history methodological frameworks, and utilizes the burgeoning medium of podcasting to increase public understanding and interaction with an historical period. For this project I have partnered with the Florida Historical Society and have utilized original materials from their collection relating to the colonial fur trade in Florida. The study of the North American fur trade has recently expanded to include more information about the indigenous societies engaged in the trade through closer examination of primary source documents, and this digital exhibit, hosted by the Florida Historical Society, created a series of module entities to achieve that end. The exhibit consists of three sections, each exploring a different aspect of the traditional discourse surrounding the colonial American fur trade in Florida, including the voices of indigenous populations and their agency in trade negotiations. Each podcast has aired as part of the Florida Historical Society's weekly radio magazine, Florida Frontiers, which is broadcast throughout the state, and is archived on the Society's website. The exhibit enhances the scholarly discussion on public history and digital history, while utilizing new media such as podcasts and interactive digital maps to create a more immersive user experience with primary source material to answer questions concerning the colonial fur trade in Florida. The project has combined new mediums of historical interpretation with traditional museum methodology and historical analysis to create a multi-faceted, unique digital experience on the web.
Identifier: CFE0006734 (IID), ucf:51868 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-08-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, History
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Panton -- Leslie and Company -- John Forbes and Company -- Florida -- Spanish Borderlands -- Fur Trade Public History -- Podcasting -- Digital History -- New Museology -- Digital Exhibit -- Florida Historical Society -- Spatial History
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0006734
Restrictions on Access: public 2017-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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