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EXAMINING FACULTY SOCIALIZATION THROUGH THE LENS OF TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Socialization may be described as a process in which an individual learns and takes on the knowledge, values, attitudes, and expectations of a group within an organization (Corcoran (&) Clark 1984; Staton (&) Darling, 1989), ultimately leading to the development of a professional identity that includes attributes of the group (Merton, Reader, (&) Kendall, 1957). Much of the literature regarding professional and organizational socialization experiences of new faculty focus solely on either clinically trained faculty or academically trained faculty, with minimal research comparing the professional and organizational socialization experiences of both degree types. Therefore, this research study explored the professional and organizational socialization experiences of new clinically trained and academically trained faculty. A qualitative phenomenological research design was implemented to explore these experiences and emergent themes revealed from the research study. During the data analysis process, there were ten clinically trained and academically trained faculty themes that emerged from the interviews and represented similarities and differences in professional and organizational socialization experiences of the faculty groups. Those themes included: self-awareness, clinician to academic, how to be an academic, mentoring, orientation, research preparation, lack of andragogy, graduate student experience, role balancing, and learn as you go. The participants' professional and organizational socialization experiences within each degree type reflected different, yet similar findings, as both groups encountered difficulties socializing into their respective faculty roles. The information gained through this research may lead to practices and program development that may improve the efficacy of professional and organizational tactics used to prepare future faculty members and for those already active in faculty member roles.
Title: EXAMINING FACULTY SOCIALIZATION THROUGH THE LENS OF TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING .
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Name(s): Plant, Jennifer, Author
King, Kathy (Kathleen), Committee Chair
Cox, Thomas, Committee Member
Campbell, Laurie, Committee Member
Marshall, Nancy, Committee Member
Mazerolle, Stephanie, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Socialization may be described as a process in which an individual learns and takes on the knowledge, values, attitudes, and expectations of a group within an organization (Corcoran (&) Clark 1984; Staton (&) Darling, 1989), ultimately leading to the development of a professional identity that includes attributes of the group (Merton, Reader, (&) Kendall, 1957). Much of the literature regarding professional and organizational socialization experiences of new faculty focus solely on either clinically trained faculty or academically trained faculty, with minimal research comparing the professional and organizational socialization experiences of both degree types. Therefore, this research study explored the professional and organizational socialization experiences of new clinically trained and academically trained faculty. A qualitative phenomenological research design was implemented to explore these experiences and emergent themes revealed from the research study. During the data analysis process, there were ten clinically trained and academically trained faculty themes that emerged from the interviews and represented similarities and differences in professional and organizational socialization experiences of the faculty groups. Those themes included: self-awareness, clinician to academic, how to be an academic, mentoring, orientation, research preparation, lack of andragogy, graduate student experience, role balancing, and learn as you go. The participants' professional and organizational socialization experiences within each degree type reflected different, yet similar findings, as both groups encountered difficulties socializing into their respective faculty roles. The information gained through this research may lead to practices and program development that may improve the efficacy of professional and organizational tactics used to prepare future faculty members and for those already active in faculty member roles.
Identifier: CFE0007075 (IID), ucf:51995 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-05-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Child, Family, and Community Sciences
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): transformative learning -- faculty socialization
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007075
Restrictions on Access: public 2018-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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