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Simulating Human Pleura Performance in Medical Training Using Measured Tissue Mechanical Properties

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Medical simulations provide hands-on training at various levels of medical expertise. Yet these simulators fail to accurately mimic the look, feel and behavior of human tissue. Applying measured mechanical properties from human cadaver tissues promises to improve the fidelity of simulated tissue behaviors when subjected to medical procedures. Samples of human parietal pleura were tested under uniaxial tension to failure and measured characteristics were replicated in synthetic pleura. Context specific parameters were then collected and compared between human pleura and the new synthetics. These comparisons tested the hypothesis; H1 Gaps exist between synthetic and human pleura performance, H2: Human tissue fracture mechanics define desired performance of synthetic tissues, H3: Synthetic and human tissues with similar stress/strain parameters will behave similarly when blunt punctured. The results promote the future development of high fidelity tissue simulants for medical training.The studied tissue is parietal pleura which contributes the critical haptic (")pop(") indicating access to the proper anatomic space during the tube thoracostomy procedure. Once accessed through blunt puncture, tube is then inserted to drain air and fluid from around the lungs.Stress/strain based hyper-elastic and fracture properties calibrated from fresh human cadaver pleura were used to define performance requirements. Synthetic pleura were then prototyped and their mechanical properties were characterized. Commercial pleura simulants were puncture tested and compared to compliant custom and off-the-shelf formulations. A non-compliant but commonly used pleura substitute was also tested. Blunt puncture force and displacement were compared for each of the materials to test the stated hypotheses.
Title: Simulating Human Pleura Performance in Medical Training Using Measured Tissue Mechanical Properties.
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Name(s): Norfleet, Jack, Author
Bai, Yuanli, Committee Chair
Kassab, Alain, Committee Member
Metcalf, David, Committee Member
Cendan, Juan, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Medical simulations provide hands-on training at various levels of medical expertise. Yet these simulators fail to accurately mimic the look, feel and behavior of human tissue. Applying measured mechanical properties from human cadaver tissues promises to improve the fidelity of simulated tissue behaviors when subjected to medical procedures. Samples of human parietal pleura were tested under uniaxial tension to failure and measured characteristics were replicated in synthetic pleura. Context specific parameters were then collected and compared between human pleura and the new synthetics. These comparisons tested the hypothesis; H1 Gaps exist between synthetic and human pleura performance, H2: Human tissue fracture mechanics define desired performance of synthetic tissues, H3: Synthetic and human tissues with similar stress/strain parameters will behave similarly when blunt punctured. The results promote the future development of high fidelity tissue simulants for medical training.The studied tissue is parietal pleura which contributes the critical haptic (")pop(") indicating access to the proper anatomic space during the tube thoracostomy procedure. Once accessed through blunt puncture, tube is then inserted to drain air and fluid from around the lungs.Stress/strain based hyper-elastic and fracture properties calibrated from fresh human cadaver pleura were used to define performance requirements. Synthetic pleura were then prototyped and their mechanical properties were characterized. Commercial pleura simulants were puncture tested and compared to compliant custom and off-the-shelf formulations. A non-compliant but commonly used pleura substitute was also tested. Blunt puncture force and displacement were compared for each of the materials to test the stated hypotheses.
Identifier: CFE0007065 (IID), ucf:52023 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-05-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Dean's Office GRDST
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): medical simulation -- human tissue -- medical training -- simulated tissue fidelity
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007065
Restrictions on Access: public 2018-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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