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Asteroid Surfaces: The Importance of Cohesive Forces

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Adhesive forces play a significant role on airless bodies due to their weak gravities. Investigating adhesion at the surface of asteroids and their constituent components is vital to understanding their formation and evolution. Previous research has been done to understand the interaction of micron-sized spheres to planar surfaces and sphere-to-sphere interactions, which have been used to develop models of asteroid surfaces. Our investigation experimentally investigates adhesion through atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements between JSC-1 simulant particles and several AFM tips, including a typical pyramidal gold tip and microspheres of sizes 2 (&)#181;m and 15 (&)#181;m. The samples of JSC-1 consist of three size ranges: (<) 45 (&)#181;m, 75-125 (&)#181;m, and 125-250 (&)#181;m. For each sample we looked at the magnitude and distribution of the measured adhesive forces. Results show that the pyramidal tip produced larger forces than the spherical tips generally, and the sample that produced larger forces and a larger distribution of those force was the smaller, more powder-like sample with sizes (<)45 (&)#181;m.
Title: Asteroid Surfaces: The Importance of Cohesive Forces.
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Name(s): Jardine, Keanna, Author
Dove, Adrienne, Committee Chair
Tetard, Laurene, Committee Member
Britt, Daniel, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Adhesive forces play a significant role on airless bodies due to their weak gravities. Investigating adhesion at the surface of asteroids and their constituent components is vital to understanding their formation and evolution. Previous research has been done to understand the interaction of micron-sized spheres to planar surfaces and sphere-to-sphere interactions, which have been used to develop models of asteroid surfaces. Our investigation experimentally investigates adhesion through atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements between JSC-1 simulant particles and several AFM tips, including a typical pyramidal gold tip and microspheres of sizes 2 (&)#181;m and 15 (&)#181;m. The samples of JSC-1 consist of three size ranges: (<) 45 (&)#181;m, 75-125 (&)#181;m, and 125-250 (&)#181;m. For each sample we looked at the magnitude and distribution of the measured adhesive forces. Results show that the pyramidal tip produced larger forces than the spherical tips generally, and the sample that produced larger forces and a larger distribution of those force was the smaller, more powder-like sample with sizes (<)45 (&)#181;m.
Identifier: CFE0007755 (IID), ucf:52377 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-12-01
M.S.
Sciences, Physics
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Asteroid Surfaces -- Regolith -- Cohesion -- Adhesion -- AFM -- Atomic Force Microscopy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007755
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-06-15
Host Institution: UCF

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