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Hibridaci(&)#243;n y subversi(&)#243;n de arquetipos femeninos latinoamericanos en Alfonsina Storni, Gabriela Mistral y Silvina Ocampo

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Social, political, and economic transformations contributed to redefine gender roles at the beginning of the twentieth century. In Latin America, Alfonsina Storni (1889-1938), Gabriela Mistral (1892-1957) and Silvina Ocampo (1906-1993) produced a hybrid narrative that challenged heteronormative conventions. In dialogue with a global realignment, they advocated for the rights of mestiza, indigenous, and working class subjects. This thesis proposes that the authors participated in a worldwide transformation that established women as historical agents. The research incorporates poems, essays, and short stories to map the emergence of independent, clever, and ambiguous models of femininity. They deployed traditional archetypes, such as the Virgin Mary, and modern subjectivities to contest the social norms that underpin patriarchy. Storni, Mistral, and Ocampo transgressed and redefined social hierarchies inherited from intellectual elites representing underprivileged populations. We observe a crosspollination of journalism and literature that includes corporeal and mystical elements. These authors actively fought for gender equality and became influential cultural producers. Mistral, for instance, was the first Latin American writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Their achievements inspire and encourage contemporary Latino women to challenge social norms and become cultural producers.
Title: Hibridaci(&)#243;n y subversi(&)#243;n de arquetipos femeninos latinoamericanos en Alfonsina Storni, Gabriela Mistral y Silvina Ocampo.
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Name(s): Ladino, Aned, Author
Izquierdo Jimenez, Lucas, Committee Chair
Lopez, Humberto, Committee CoChair
Nalbone, Lisa, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Social, political, and economic transformations contributed to redefine gender roles at the beginning of the twentieth century. In Latin America, Alfonsina Storni (1889-1938), Gabriela Mistral (1892-1957) and Silvina Ocampo (1906-1993) produced a hybrid narrative that challenged heteronormative conventions. In dialogue with a global realignment, they advocated for the rights of mestiza, indigenous, and working class subjects. This thesis proposes that the authors participated in a worldwide transformation that established women as historical agents. The research incorporates poems, essays, and short stories to map the emergence of independent, clever, and ambiguous models of femininity. They deployed traditional archetypes, such as the Virgin Mary, and modern subjectivities to contest the social norms that underpin patriarchy. Storni, Mistral, and Ocampo transgressed and redefined social hierarchies inherited from intellectual elites representing underprivileged populations. We observe a crosspollination of journalism and literature that includes corporeal and mystical elements. These authors actively fought for gender equality and became influential cultural producers. Mistral, for instance, was the first Latin American writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Their achievements inspire and encourage contemporary Latino women to challenge social norms and become cultural producers.
Identifier: CFE0007758 (IID), ucf:52383 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-12-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, Modern Languages
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Alfonsina Storni -- Gabriela Mistral -- Silvina Ocampo -- hybridization -- female archetypes -- Diana Taylor -- Jacques Rancière
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007758
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-06-15
Host Institution: UCF

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