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Teacher Candidates' Civic Attitudes and Civic Knowledge: A Comparative Study

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
The foundations of a democratic society are the citizens who engage in its political processes and functions. The democratic skills and dispositions needed to be engaged citizens must be embedded within the school system of that society. In the United States, teachers serve as the delivery system of these skills and dispositions, and it is therefore imperative to understand who these teachers are as citizens. Leveraging survey research and various quantitative measures, the civic attitudes and civic knowledge of teacher candidates in various fields were investigated. Using self-reported demographic information, teacher candidates were compared based on their academic program track, gender, race, and status as a college student (first generation or other). Initial findings indicate statistically significant differences in the mean civic attitudinal scores and civic knowledge based on program track and college student status. How the findings may influence the long-term outlook of civic education and the needs for preparing future teachers are discussed.
Title: Teacher Candidates' Civic Attitudes and Civic Knowledge: A Comparative Study.
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Name(s): Furgione, Brian, Author
Russell, William, Committee Chair
Waring, Scott, Committee Member
Hewitt, Randall, Committee Member
Jahani, Shiva, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The foundations of a democratic society are the citizens who engage in its political processes and functions. The democratic skills and dispositions needed to be engaged citizens must be embedded within the school system of that society. In the United States, teachers serve as the delivery system of these skills and dispositions, and it is therefore imperative to understand who these teachers are as citizens. Leveraging survey research and various quantitative measures, the civic attitudes and civic knowledge of teacher candidates in various fields were investigated. Using self-reported demographic information, teacher candidates were compared based on their academic program track, gender, race, and status as a college student (first generation or other). Initial findings indicate statistically significant differences in the mean civic attitudinal scores and civic knowledge based on program track and college student status. How the findings may influence the long-term outlook of civic education and the needs for preparing future teachers are discussed.
Identifier: CFE0007633 (IID), ucf:52474 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-08-01
Ph.D.
Community Innovation and Education, School of Teacher Education
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Civic education -- civic attitudes -- civic knowledge -- teacher candidates -- democratic education
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007633
Restrictions on Access: campus 2022-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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