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Use of Video-Enhanced Debriefing in Clinical Nursing Skill Acquisition: Indwelling Urinary Catheterization as an Exemplar

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Nursing students struggle to acquire and maintain clinical psychomotor skills. Hiring agencies bear the cost of retraining graduate nurses inept with skills learned early in their nursing curriculum. Improperly performed clinical skills pose a risk to patient safety, resulting in pain and suffering for the patient. This empirical study aimed to determine if video-enhanced debriefing (VED) improved initial skill validation scores, skill feedback, satisfaction with learning, and reduced skill decay among first-semester, pre-licensure BSN students performing female indwelling urinary catheterization (IUC) in a simulated clinical setting compared to no debriefing. Participants received standard instruction, then video-recorded their IUC skill. Participants randomized into the VED group individually participated in an advocacy/inquiry debriefing with the principal investigator while viewing their performance video. Both groups completed a summative IUC skill validation per standard course instruction and submitted their skill performance ratings. All participants completed a survey including their perceived IUC knowledge, amount of skill practice, learning satisfaction with VED, and an evaluation of their skill performance feedback. All participants re-recorded their IUC skill and received performances ratings with the same instruments again ten weeks after the initial skill validation. The analysis revealed that VED did not improve nursing skills, knowledge, practice, or perceptions of the learning experience compared to the video-only group. Nursing students in the VED condition did rate their skill performance feedback higher than those in the video-only group. Students improved performance in both conditions, showing that learning via video is an effective teaching strategy to enhance student's satisfaction with learning, to engage in repetitive practice with feedback, and to improve learning.
Title: Use of Video-Enhanced Debriefing in Clinical Nursing Skill Acquisition: Indwelling Urinary Catheterization as an Exemplar.
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Name(s): Hoyt, Erica, Author
Gill, Michele, Committee Chair
Clark, M. H., Committee Member
Chase, Susan, Committee Member
Gonzalez, Laura, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Nursing students struggle to acquire and maintain clinical psychomotor skills. Hiring agencies bear the cost of retraining graduate nurses inept with skills learned early in their nursing curriculum. Improperly performed clinical skills pose a risk to patient safety, resulting in pain and suffering for the patient. This empirical study aimed to determine if video-enhanced debriefing (VED) improved initial skill validation scores, skill feedback, satisfaction with learning, and reduced skill decay among first-semester, pre-licensure BSN students performing female indwelling urinary catheterization (IUC) in a simulated clinical setting compared to no debriefing. Participants received standard instruction, then video-recorded their IUC skill. Participants randomized into the VED group individually participated in an advocacy/inquiry debriefing with the principal investigator while viewing their performance video. Both groups completed a summative IUC skill validation per standard course instruction and submitted their skill performance ratings. All participants completed a survey including their perceived IUC knowledge, amount of skill practice, learning satisfaction with VED, and an evaluation of their skill performance feedback. All participants re-recorded their IUC skill and received performances ratings with the same instruments again ten weeks after the initial skill validation. The analysis revealed that VED did not improve nursing skills, knowledge, practice, or perceptions of the learning experience compared to the video-only group. Nursing students in the VED condition did rate their skill performance feedback higher than those in the video-only group. Students improved performance in both conditions, showing that learning via video is an effective teaching strategy to enhance student's satisfaction with learning, to engage in repetitive practice with feedback, and to improve learning.
Identifier: CFE0007656 (IID), ucf:52504 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-08-01
Ed.D.
Community Innovation and Education, Learning Sciences and Educational Research
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Psychomotor skill learning -- Clinical competence -- Video recording -- Debriefing -- Feedback -- Video-enhanced debriefing -- Learning satisfaction -- Nursing Students -- Nursing Education Research -- Deliberate practice -- Skill acquisition -- Nursing skills
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007656
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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