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The efficacy and feasibility of neuropsychological services in a primary care setting.

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Integrated primary care assimilates psychologists into the primary care setting, thus improving health outcomes and physician satisfaction. Neuropsychology has also begun to assimilate into primary care, as neurocognitive impairment is a correlate of many medical disorders. Subjective cognitive decline (SCD), a common complaint among older adults, is an increasingly recognized warning sign of non-normative cognitive aging. These patients typically present first to their primary care providers who may play a critical role in the early detection of cognitive impairment. Given the growing awareness about cognitive health and disability, the importance of neuropsychological assessment as a standard component of integrated care has been recognized by providers. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy and feasibility of neuropsychological services, for memory concerns, in a community primary care setting. The study also explored the relationship between SCD and performance on neurocognitive measures and satisfaction levels for both patient participants and medical providers. A total of 16 patient participants completed the study. On average, patients were in their late-60's and mostly female and Caucasian. Participants completed a brief interview, neurocognitive evaluation, self-report measures of SCD and mood, and satisfaction survey. Results did not reveal significant correlations between SCD and neurocognitive performance. Significantly more referrals were made to the onsite neurocognitive clinic, than were made for outside services in a nine-month period preceding the described program. Patients referred to the onsite clinic were also significantly more likely to have an accessible report located in their EMR than those referred offsite. Both participants and medical providers were reportedly satisfied with clinic services. Results suggest that a clinic of this nature has promising benefits and is well-liked by both patients and providers, though barriers related to full utilization of services remain a challenge. Further research with a larger, more diverse sample is recommended. ?
Title: The efficacy and feasibility of neuropsychological services in a primary care setting.
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Name(s): Herring, Danielle, Author
Paulson, Daniel, Committee Chair
Sherod, Megan, Committee Member
Blaney, Cerissa, Committee Member
Cannarozzi, Maria, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Integrated primary care assimilates psychologists into the primary care setting, thus improving health outcomes and physician satisfaction. Neuropsychology has also begun to assimilate into primary care, as neurocognitive impairment is a correlate of many medical disorders. Subjective cognitive decline (SCD), a common complaint among older adults, is an increasingly recognized warning sign of non-normative cognitive aging. These patients typically present first to their primary care providers who may play a critical role in the early detection of cognitive impairment. Given the growing awareness about cognitive health and disability, the importance of neuropsychological assessment as a standard component of integrated care has been recognized by providers. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy and feasibility of neuropsychological services, for memory concerns, in a community primary care setting. The study also explored the relationship between SCD and performance on neurocognitive measures and satisfaction levels for both patient participants and medical providers. A total of 16 patient participants completed the study. On average, patients were in their late-60's and mostly female and Caucasian. Participants completed a brief interview, neurocognitive evaluation, self-report measures of SCD and mood, and satisfaction survey. Results did not reveal significant correlations between SCD and neurocognitive performance. Significantly more referrals were made to the onsite neurocognitive clinic, than were made for outside services in a nine-month period preceding the described program. Patients referred to the onsite clinic were also significantly more likely to have an accessible report located in their EMR than those referred offsite. Both participants and medical providers were reportedly satisfied with clinic services. Results suggest that a clinic of this nature has promising benefits and is well-liked by both patients and providers, though barriers related to full utilization of services remain a challenge. Further research with a larger, more diverse sample is recommended. ?
Identifier: CFE0007653 (IID), ucf:52508 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): neuropsychology -- integrated primary care -- memory disorders -- subjective cognitive decline -- neuropsychological assessment -- neurocognitive clinic
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007653
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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