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A phenomenological study of Black fifth grade students' perceptions of social studies and a discussion with secondary students.

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
The problem I address in this study is the lack of Black elementary students' knowledge and interest of the social studies content. Black students who lack a true identity of self, fail to develop into productive citizens. Although previous studies have examined Black students' experiences in secondary social studies classrooms, few have thoroughly examined Black students' experiences in the elementary classrooms. For this study, I analyze Black fifth grade students' perceptions of the social studies content. Identifying these perceptions is imperative so educators can adjust their pedagogical practices based on what they deem as important for educational growth, and the experiences of Black students. Allowing Black students to share their experiences and express their thoughts is conducive to their knowledge and awareness of the subject (Scott, 2017). To grasp an authentic analysis of student understanding educators must start in the primary grades. Previous research highlights that curriculum and instruction fails to align with what students, especially Black students need to be successful in the classroom. Identifying these areas in elementary school will create a smooth transition for students as they advance to the next level.
Title: A phenomenological study of Black fifth grade students' perceptions of social studies and a discussion with secondary students.
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Name(s): Walker, Irenea, Author
Russell, William, Committee Chair
Hewitt, Randall, Committee Member
Hopp, Carolyn, Committee Member
Huff-Corzine, Lin, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The problem I address in this study is the lack of Black elementary students' knowledge and interest of the social studies content. Black students who lack a true identity of self, fail to develop into productive citizens. Although previous studies have examined Black students' experiences in secondary social studies classrooms, few have thoroughly examined Black students' experiences in the elementary classrooms. For this study, I analyze Black fifth grade students' perceptions of the social studies content. Identifying these perceptions is imperative so educators can adjust their pedagogical practices based on what they deem as important for educational growth, and the experiences of Black students. Allowing Black students to share their experiences and express their thoughts is conducive to their knowledge and awareness of the subject (Scott, 2017). To grasp an authentic analysis of student understanding educators must start in the primary grades. Previous research highlights that curriculum and instruction fails to align with what students, especially Black students need to be successful in the classroom. Identifying these areas in elementary school will create a smooth transition for students as they advance to the next level.
Identifier: CFE0007591 (IID), ucf:52547 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-08-01
Ph.D.
Community Innovation and Education, School of Teacher Education
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Social studies -- Black students -- critical race theory -- fifth grade students -- multiple perspectives -- secondary social studies classrooms
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007591
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-02-15
Host Institution: UCF

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