You are here

Fanfiction Reviews and Academic Literacy: Potential Impacts and Implications

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
This study is meant to elucidate how fanfiction-related activities can incorporate many types of critical review, to call attention to what has been overlooked as significant forms of learning, and to understand and take advantage of the opportunities fanfiction's unconventional writing affords in lieu of more deliberate learning environments. This thesis was undertaken due to the significant gap in work done by aca-fan (-) a portmanteau of academic and fan(-) scholars who have strong links to the fanfiction community and culture. The aspects explored are the technical writing skills and techniques demonstrated in fanfiction reviews, the influence of the nontraditional online learning environment, the rhetorical strategies that reviewers use to give feedback, the significant categories of things that reviewers comment on, and the value of skills taught peer-to-peer in this manner. The results of my research suggest that peer review in a relaxed, non-academic context leads to improved confidence and skill among a wide demographic range. This thesis proposes that fanfiction writing, reading, and reviewing supports learning. The evidence suggests that it be incorporated where applicable in formal classroom learning to supplement traditional understandings of grammar, syntax, tone, and the use of universal tropes.
Title: Fanfiction Reviews and Academic Literacy: Potential Impacts and Implications.
19 views
15 downloads
Name(s): Weiler, Regina, Author
Katt, James, Committee Chair
Musambira, George, Committee Member
Butler, John, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study is meant to elucidate how fanfiction-related activities can incorporate many types of critical review, to call attention to what has been overlooked as significant forms of learning, and to understand and take advantage of the opportunities fanfiction's unconventional writing affords in lieu of more deliberate learning environments. This thesis was undertaken due to the significant gap in work done by aca-fan (-) a portmanteau of academic and fan(-) scholars who have strong links to the fanfiction community and culture. The aspects explored are the technical writing skills and techniques demonstrated in fanfiction reviews, the influence of the nontraditional online learning environment, the rhetorical strategies that reviewers use to give feedback, the significant categories of things that reviewers comment on, and the value of skills taught peer-to-peer in this manner. The results of my research suggest that peer review in a relaxed, non-academic context leads to improved confidence and skill among a wide demographic range. This thesis proposes that fanfiction writing, reading, and reviewing supports learning. The evidence suggests that it be incorporated where applicable in formal classroom learning to supplement traditional understandings of grammar, syntax, tone, and the use of universal tropes.
Identifier: CFE0007553 (IID), ucf:52603 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-05-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, Writing and Rhetoric
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): fanfiction -- fanfic -- writing -- reviewing -- dragonball z -- Internet communities -- fandom -- online learning environment -- rhetoric -- critique -- peer review -- students as teachers -- classroom application -- online classrooms -- writing about writing -- FF.net -- fanfiction.net -- English language learners -- New media literacy -- Savior of Demons
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007553
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections