You are here

Detection of Mercury Through Surface Plasmon Resonance of Immobilized Gold Nanorods

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Mercury is a known environmental pollutant that can damage the brain, heart, kidney and lungs upon exposure. Emissions from fossil fuel plants can release mercury into the air, where it can settle into the water supply and be exposed to human and aquatic life. The use of gold nanorods functionalized on solid substrates as a mercury sensor in tap water samples is investigated herein. The functionalization of the substrates involves the physical immobilization of the nanorods onto the solid surface through the use of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). The immobilization of the nanorods drastically increases their stability, allowing for use in complicated sample matrices. When gold nanorods are exposed to mercury in aqueous samples, their amalgamation to mercury metal causes a reduction of the effective aspect ratio of the nanoparticles and a blue shift of their maximum longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption wavelength. Quantitative analysis is made possible due to the linear correlation that exists between the concentration of mercury and the wavelength shift of the maximum SPR absorption wavelength. In order to achieve the quantitative amalgamation of Hg (II) with the nanorods, it is necessary to reduce the mercury ions to mercury metal, which is accomplished herein via chemical or electrochemical processes. Chemical reduction of mercury was been carried out with a strong reducing agent, specifically sodium borohydride. Electrochemical reduction has been accomplished with gold nanorods immobilized on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) substrates. Mercury determination in tap water using the immobilized gold nanorods was successfully conducted, with further experiments on improving selectivity with potential control, and improving sensitivity through flow injection analysis.
Title: Detection of Mercury Through Surface Plasmon Resonance of Immobilized Gold Nanorods.
17 views
10 downloads
Name(s): Trieu, Khang, Author
Campiglia, Andres, Committee Chair
Rex, Matthew, Committee Member
Heider, Emily, Committee Member
Frazer, Andrew, Committee Member
Harper, James, Committee Member
Bhattacharya, Aniket, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Mercury is a known environmental pollutant that can damage the brain, heart, kidney and lungs upon exposure. Emissions from fossil fuel plants can release mercury into the air, where it can settle into the water supply and be exposed to human and aquatic life. The use of gold nanorods functionalized on solid substrates as a mercury sensor in tap water samples is investigated herein. The functionalization of the substrates involves the physical immobilization of the nanorods onto the solid surface through the use of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). The immobilization of the nanorods drastically increases their stability, allowing for use in complicated sample matrices. When gold nanorods are exposed to mercury in aqueous samples, their amalgamation to mercury metal causes a reduction of the effective aspect ratio of the nanoparticles and a blue shift of their maximum longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption wavelength. Quantitative analysis is made possible due to the linear correlation that exists between the concentration of mercury and the wavelength shift of the maximum SPR absorption wavelength. In order to achieve the quantitative amalgamation of Hg (II) with the nanorods, it is necessary to reduce the mercury ions to mercury metal, which is accomplished herein via chemical or electrochemical processes. Chemical reduction of mercury was been carried out with a strong reducing agent, specifically sodium borohydride. Electrochemical reduction has been accomplished with gold nanorods immobilized on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) substrates. Mercury determination in tap water using the immobilized gold nanorods was successfully conducted, with further experiments on improving selectivity with potential control, and improving sensitivity through flow injection analysis.
Identifier: CFE0007544 (IID), ucf:52604 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Chemistry
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Sensors -- Mercury -- Gold Nanorods -- UV-Vis Spectroscopy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007544
Restrictions on Access: campus 2022-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections